Mu Cephei

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SkyBrowser
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Mu Cephei

Post by SkyBrowser »

While looking for the nova last Friday night I took a quick look at Mu Cephei, the Garnet Star. It's certainly red! Much redder than Arcturus for example, though I always see an orangey colour when I look at that.

It's a semi-regular variable with a quoted period of 730 days and a range of 3.4 to 5.1. It looked to be at the bright end of the range to me.

Anybody else looked at it recently?

Garnet Star.png
Garnet Star.png (79.85 KiB) Viewed 139 times
brian livesey
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Re: Mu Cephei

Post by brian livesey »

I haven’t seen this star for many years. It’s very pretty.
brian
jeff.stevens
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Re: Mu Cephei

Post by jeff.stevens »

It’s one of my favourites, and I revisit it quite often.

Best wishes, Jeff.
nigeljoslin
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Re: Mu Cephei

Post by nigeljoslin »

I visit the Garnett Star regularly, too. Its colour through the 14 inch is particularly mesmerising, an indescribable hue of great depth.

A beautiful carbon-star
Skywatcher 350P f4.65, Skywatcher StarTravel 102 f5, Adler Optik 9x63 binoculars
SkyBrowser
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Re: Mu Cephei

Post by SkyBrowser »

Has anybody noticed any sign of variability?
stella
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Re: Mu Cephei

Post by stella »

"Garnett Star"? Do you mean Warren Mitchell?
Tracie Heywood
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Re: Mu Cephei

Post by Tracie Heywood »

SkyBrowser wrote: Wed Apr 07, 2021 10:56 am Has anybody noticed any sign of variability?
I've been monitoring Mu Cephei since the 1980s.

For most of the time, Mu Cephei varies slowly over a range of about half a magnitude in the top half of the listed magnitude range - it only rarely dips down to mag 5.1.

I usually see its range as 3.8-4.2, but due to its strong red colour, it is quite common for some observers to see a range a few tenths of a magnitude brighter and for others to see a range a few tenths fainter.
SkyBrowser
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Re: Mu Cephei

Post by SkyBrowser »

stella wrote: Wed Apr 07, 2021 12:02 pm "Garnett Star"? Do you mean Warren Mitchell?
Would that be the Alfa star?
SkyBrowser
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Re: Mu Cephei

Post by SkyBrowser »

Tracie Heywood wrote: Wed Apr 07, 2021 1:45 pm due to its strong red colour, it is quite common for some observers to see a range a few tenths of a magnitude brighter and for others to see a range a few tenths fainter.
We all react differently to red???
Tracie Heywood
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Re: Mu Cephei

Post by Tracie Heywood »

The red sensitivity of the eyes varies from person to person, much more than it does for the other colours of visible light.

For some *very* red stars, differences in brightness estimates between observers can be as much as a magnitude!
michael feist
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Re: Mu Cephei

Post by michael feist »

Estimating LPV stars, which are of reddish hue, I found particularly difficult. I found generally estimating magnitudes of stars problematic anyway. There are so many things to consider, include not looking for too long, the distribution in the fov, and ones own colour-sensitivity. Even different colour sensitivity between ones own eyes. The Moon, for example, I find to be much richer coloured in one eye than the other.
Anyway, yes, I did look at mu Cephei a couple of nights ago and a distinctive and colourful sight it was amongst the fainter field-stars. reards maf
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