Regulus and Mars

Here's the place for any sights you wish to remark on

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mike a feist
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Regulus and Mars

Post by mike a feist »

In binoculars the colour contrast is superb.......after dusk a "blue" Regulus is close to a "red" Mars making a superb view.......even to the unaided eye these two objects in the sky side by side make a striking pair. maf
andrew robertson
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Post by andrew robertson »

Totally agree. Went out about 11pm wed for an observing stint - as soon as I walked out of the door these two caught my eye and I just stood looking at them for about 5 mins - glorious sight.

Andrew
Paul Freeman
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Regulus and Mars

Post by Paul Freeman »

I saw them both as well last night,around 11.00pm. It certainly was a very nice sight. Presumably they will be moving even closer together.
Paul.
mike a feist
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Post by mike a feist »

Closest occurs on Sunday according to Sky at Night mag where magnitudes are given as 1.2 for the planet and 1.3 for the star........it is interesting when looking at them in optics, to see how their different colours affect ones judgement of brightness. maf
Cliff
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Post by Cliff »

Dear Mike
Your comment in effect about different star colours (perhaps especially red ones) being a factor in how we perceive the brightness of stars is very valid, and is taken into account by variable star observers (in particular the so-called "purkinje effect" related to red).
However, when it comes to estimating the apparent magnitude of bright planets I think it very difficult, because of their excessive brilliance. The same applies to the brightest stars.
I think all amateur astronomers should have a go at making magnitude estimates of some variable stars, just to get an idea of what this important aspect of astronomy it is all about.
Best wishes from Cliff
mike a feist
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Post by mike a feist »

Hello Cliff........there are so many optic effects working concerning re colours, relative positions etc etc that find it very difficult. As for estimating the brightness of binocular comets, this is "like measuring fog" to me......the best I can to do is to compare them to nearby Globular Clusters!
The Mars and Regulus conjuction (appulse) was visible here before bed last evening still nicely show in same fov....rubbish weather by morning though and no chance for the comet.
regards mike
Cliff
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Post by Cliff »

Dear Mike
I totally agree with you that estimating the apparent magnitude of comets is very tricky. However, that said, I on the relatively few occasions I do observe a nice binocular comet I personally usually try to make an estimate, even though knowing my estimate is not likely to be very definitive - to say the least.
However, I totally chickened out, trying to estimate Comet Lulin a year or two back because amongst other things I couldn't make any defocuss any stars sufficiently in my binoculars.
Twenty odd years ago I had tentative ideas of observing variable stars seriously and made a hundred or so VS estimates of some easy variables, which I think have stood me in good stead even though I didn't become a serious VS observer.
Over the years I have made a few binocular estimates of Uranus, Neptune and the odd brighter asteroid. Of course with them it's pretty easy (and easy to cheat as well because their apparent brightnesses are well known. Even so I think it is good practice for observers to make their own estimates - there is no need to tell anyone if they are shy about it.
Yes, the weather here has been pretty rubbish as well, but I'm told there might be a chance of better things in the next day or two.
I did though manage to look at the Sun this afternoon with my Coronado PST.
Best wishes from Cliff
Best wishes from Cliff
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