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PostPosted: Sun May 14, 2017 12:24 pm 
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Joined: Sun May 11, 2008 6:11 pm
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Location: Portslade, Sussex Lat 50deg 51min Long 0deg 13mins West
Sunday 14th May 2017, 1150-1230BST: Venus now rising well before the Sun, and I sat under the garden Yew thereby hiding the Sun for safety while searching. First located Venus using 9x40 hunting binoculars, and easily visible in this although phase not really clear. Then used Hawke Endurance 12x36x50 spotter and the fat crescent with cusps pointing downwards was nicely shown. Followed until 1230BST, when went in for lunch.


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PostPosted: Sun May 14, 2017 5:59 pm 
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Location: New Farnley, Leeds lat 53.8N long 1.6W
What a perfect day you've had Mike. I spent mine making a dovetail shoe for my photo tripod, having stupidly misplaced the original part! Best wishes Bob


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PostPosted: Wed May 17, 2017 12:28 pm 
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Location: Portslade, Sussex Lat 50deg 51min Long 0deg 13mins West
To the Foredown Tower yesterday, tuesday 16th May. Blue sky and sunny but windy on the hill. While there, in the grounds and Sun's shadow, managed to locate VENUS almost straight away in my 9x40 binos and also in an old 50mm spotter on tripod. Followed betweeen 0955 and 1040 BST, until cirrus became a bit of a problem. No chance to see it today though as grey sky here. (Venus in Daylight, Obs #497). regards maf


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 07, 2017 8:20 pm 
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Location: Portslade, Sussex Lat 50deg 51min Long 0deg 13mins West
7th June 2017, 0845-1155 BST; . Continuing my long-term series of daytime sightings of planet Venus, today I set up the Acuter DS65 (with 32mm eyepiece = 12x magnification) in the back garden at 0845 BST, with the Sun hidden behind the Yew Tree as a safety precaution. The sky was nicely blue and with only a few bits of passing cloud, although conditions deteriorated during the morning as the strong wind drove the clouds across. Judging the rough angular distance from the hidden Sun, I soon picked out Venus in the scope, with small disc and more or less visible phase. Kept track of it, gradually panning the scope to follow it, intermittently as the clouds came and went. ( Seen at 0845, 0855, 0900, 0921, 0950, 1030, 0140, 1050, 1100, 1110, and finally at 1155 BST.) On a few occasions repositioned the tripod to remain in the shadow of the yew tree. Thought later on to attempt an experiment by using a Red #25a eyepiece filter, and the result was very successful as the blue sky was nicely darkened and Venus appeared as a "small glowing red coal" dancing in and out and through the clouds.[Venus in Daylight Obs#503] regards maf


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PostPosted: Fri Jun 09, 2017 5:46 am 
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Joined: Fri Dec 31, 2004 11:32 am
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Location: Macclesfield Cheshire
Once I have finished looking at our Star. I often move my IOptron MT II onto Venus.

The best views I have had, have always been in daylight, because there isn't the glare. Venus is kinder to the eye, set against a blue sky. I have seen Mercury and Jupiter during the day.

Plus a number of bright stars.

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PostPosted: Fri Jun 09, 2017 11:27 am 
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Location: Lancashire
It's often been said that the brighter planets are best observed in twilight, to moderate glare. Some of us find that it works better than against a black background.
Not everyone agrees, including our David Frydman. People's visual responses seem to differ.

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PostPosted: Fri Jun 09, 2017 1:55 pm 
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Location: Portslade, Sussex Lat 50deg 51min Long 0deg 13mins West
By "Venus in Daylight" I do not mean "Venus in twilight". For sightings of Venus to warrant being added to my list, the Sun must be up above the horizon. Of couse as I only use low magnification I do not expect much, and often no, detail on this planets .in these scopes.
I do have a much shorter list of sightings of Jupiter with the Sun up, but although it is such a bright planet, the disk always looks so very pale and washed out against a blue sky. regards maf


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PostPosted: Fri Jun 09, 2017 4:58 pm 
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I would think that Venus and Mercury might benefit from twilight or daylight, but not the other planets to me.

Regards,
David


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 12, 2017 4:28 pm 
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Location: Lancashire
One of the cleanest view of Mars I had David was years ago through a PRINZ 3-inch refractor. It was a warm, late summer's, evening with twilight approaching.
Mars was at its closest to Earth and the North Polar Icecap was plain to see, along with subtle surface shadings.

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PostPosted: Tue Jun 13, 2017 5:18 am 
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Location: Macclesfield Cheshire
I have seen both Inferior planets in Daylight. I usually wait until local noon to see, Venus.

I saw Mercury this year after a looking at Venus.

On the occasion that I did see Jupiter. It was very faint, and very ghostly in daylight.

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https://www.flickr.com/photos/paulabrierley/
http://pabastronomy.blogspot.co.uk/2018/


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 18, 2017 2:43 pm 
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Location: Macclesfield Cheshire
This morning, with the weather, like it is. I had the Mini Tower 2 set up outside the Whirlpool. On it I had both PST and OMC 140.

I was able to see Venus again, in daylight at 10:10hrs ut with OMC 140. With a 35mm ep (x57) Venus showed a gibbous phase.

I could see some dark shadows on the edge of the terminator.

Of cause with the heat. I was only able to use a low power eyepiece, and at x57 the planet was shimmering in the heat.

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Observation Co-ordinator for.
Macclesfield Astronomical Society
https://www.flickr.com/photos/paulabrierley/
http://pabastronomy.blogspot.co.uk/2018/


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PostPosted: Sun Nov 12, 2017 11:20 am 
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Location: Stoke-on-Trent
The forecast, for my location, looks good for tomorrow's conjunction of Venus and Jupiter. It should be an impressive sight, if the weather holds.

It reminded me that I hadn't attempted to observe Venus in daylight for a long time, so with it being a relatively clear morning, I've just had a go at finding Venus using an 8x23 and an 8x56 binocular. Being very careful to keep the Sun blocked out of view by the side wall of my house, I was able to pick out Venus after a couple of minutes of slow scanning, at 10:55am. A pinpoint bright dot against a light blue background - superb to see. I'd forgotten that it seems to take some careful, very slow scanning (for me, at least) to pick it up, but once spotted it seems blindingly obvious thereafter.

I notice that the Starry Night Planetarium software is currently showing the distance of Venus from the observer to be 1.64 astronomical units, which I think is just over 152 million miles away.

Best wishes, Jeff.


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PostPosted: Sun Nov 12, 2017 7:24 pm 
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Could someone please tell me at what time Venus will be exactly south east tomorrow?
Also the elevation above the horizon?
That is my best chance of seeing it, if it is clear.

Regards,
David


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PostPosted: Sun Nov 12, 2017 7:43 pm 
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Location: Wellingborough
Hello David.

Skymap tells me that Venus will be at
azimuth 135deg 0min 3sec and
altitude 14deg 34min 13sec
at 07h55min24sec UT

The Sun will be at alt 4.5deg at that time.

Regards,

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PostPosted: Sun Nov 12, 2017 9:29 pm 
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Thank you very much Brian.

I think it will be a few degrees too low for me because of the monster building nearby.

Maybe if I go to the hall I can see it perhaps 20 minutes later.

I'll see if I can find my inclinometer or whatever it is called.

It has to be clear and I'll try a WA binocular.

Regards,
David


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