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 Post subject: Mira is Bright!
PostPosted: Mon Jan 15, 2018 9:36 pm 
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Joined: Sun May 11, 2008 6:11 pm
Posts: 3303
Location: Portslade, Sussex Lat 50deg 51min Long 0deg 13mins West
15th January 2018, 1800-1900 GMT: After a very rainly day, the clouds cleared after sunset. MIRA was visible in the south by unaided vision despite lots of early evening light pollution. Used 8x40 binocular in which MIRA was "quite yellow" and probably brighter than delta Ceti (at 4.1), but not as bright as gamma Ceti (at 3.2). regards maf


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 Post subject: Re: Mira is Bright!
PostPosted: Tue Jan 16, 2018 12:25 pm 
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Joined: Thu Jun 02, 2016 11:32 am
Posts: 539
Location: New Farnley, Leeds lat 53.8N long 1.6W
Hello Mike, following your post about Mira, I took a look from here in Melbourne. It is not high in the sky and affected by city lights so not visible to my unaided eyes. I spotted it in 8x40 binoculars and at 12.10 UT today I estimated it at mag 3.36 by comparison with star E (Mag 3.56 plus 2 steps) on the SPA vss chart. As you say it's a yellow colour (perhaps with an orange tint to my eyes). The colour makes estimates tricky. All the best Mike, Bob


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 Post subject: Re: Mira is Bright!
PostPosted: Wed Jan 17, 2018 11:01 am 
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Joined: Thu Jun 02, 2016 11:32 am
Posts: 539
Location: New Farnley, Leeds lat 53.8N long 1.6W
Melbourne, Aus. 2018 Jan 17, 10.50 UT. 8x40 bins. Slightly hazy sky conditions. Mira estimated E+2,Pogson step. E=mag 3.56, SPA vss chart. Mira estimated mag is 3.36. Regards Bob


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 Post subject: Re: Mira is Bright!
PostPosted: Wed Jan 17, 2018 1:25 pm 
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Joined: Sun May 11, 2008 6:11 pm
Posts: 3303
Location: Portslade, Sussex Lat 50deg 51min Long 0deg 13mins West
Thank you for your replies re MIRA. I find it hopelessly difficult to compare magnitudes especial when stars are different in colour! I originally wrote "rich yellow" but much depends on what instrument used, I think. "Red" often seems a rather vague "cop out" ...Betelgeuse and Antares...are they "red", is "Arcturus" orange or yellow? If it is "orange" what colour was it before oranges were known in the Europe? Some of the old books include some wonderful names for star colours, especially when "doubles"! regards maf


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 Post subject: Re: Mira is Bright!
PostPosted: Wed Jan 17, 2018 9:39 pm 
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Joined: Thu Jun 02, 2016 11:32 am
Posts: 539
Location: New Farnley, Leeds lat 53.8N long 1.6W
Yes Mike, double star observers do get a bit fanciful, don't they? You only have to read my threads to see how they get carried away! How about "burnt Siena" instead of orange? :lol: By the way a short time after the last Mira obs iI stumbled across a report of a nova discovery by an Australian here in Victoria on Jan 14. Rob Kaufman if I remember. Nova Muscae 2018. I only have a rough chart from the wiki page and I think I spotted it in 8x40s at 11.40 UT today. Bob


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 Post subject: Re: Mira is Bright!
PostPosted: Tue Jan 23, 2018 11:55 am 
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Joined: Thu Jun 02, 2016 11:32 am
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Location: New Farnley, Leeds lat 53.8N long 1.6W
2018 Jan 23, 11.30UT. Sky hazy. 8x40 bins. Melbourne, Aus. Mira seems brighter than last week but that is a bit subjective - it's colour seems more obvious tonight. I make two estimates. Pogson step gives mag 3.26 (E+3) and a fractional estimate gives 3.38 (C4v1E) SPA vss chart. So objectively My estimates make Mira about the same as last week. Anyone else have any estimates to compare? Tracie?
Regards, Bob
PS can't see my suspected nova Muscae candidate tonight - faded or is the sky condition too unfavourable?


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 Post subject: Re: Mira is Bright!
PostPosted: Tue Jan 23, 2018 4:32 pm 
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Joined: Mon Jan 09, 2006 11:05 am
Posts: 5361
Location: Lancashire
Regarding star colours, some of the celebrated Victorian observers, such as Webb and Smyth, used colourful descriptions for stars. For example, "apple green" ( Smyth ).

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brian


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 Post subject: Re: Mira is Bright!
PostPosted: Wed Jan 24, 2018 11:11 pm 
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Joined: Fri Dec 03, 2004 12:51 pm
Posts: 2514
Location: Stoke-on-Trent
Managed to nip out for half an hour and have a scan of the night sky using an 8x56 binocular, including an observation of Mira. I thought I could detect a slight orange colouration when I initially observed, but towards the end of my session I was struggling to detect any real colour. My eyes were a tad tired this evening though.

I had a go at plotting the surrounding stars. HIP11218, at magnitude +7.18, closest to Mira at roughly the 10 O'clock position, was just on the edge of visibility. The Moon approaching first quarter was hampering things slightly. Very nice to see though.

Best wishes, Jeff.


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 Post subject: Re: Mira is Bright!
PostPosted: Sun Jan 28, 2018 11:52 am 
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Location: New Farnley, Leeds lat 53.8N long 1.6W
2018 January 28, 11.15 UT. Mira appears to be about mag 3.2 or 3.3 in 8x40 bins, moonlight and haze. Bob


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