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PostPosted: Mon Feb 12, 2018 9:15 am 
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Joined: Fri Dec 03, 2004 12:51 pm
Posts: 2514
Location: Stoke-on-Trent
What a beautiful crisp, clear start to the day. I didn't get time to observe for long, but I was able to have a quick look at Jupiter, Mars, Saturn and the waning Moon at 6:45am.

The crescent looked stunningly bright, and in an 8x56 binocular the Earthshine effect was evident, and just to the right of the Moon I could detect the magnitude +3.50 star 37 Sagittarii.

Mars was still easily visible to the unaided eye. With the 8x56 I could see the magnitude +4.45 star 9 Ophiuci in the same field of view, to the right of Mars.

With Jupiter, I could just see Ganymede to its right, in the binocular view.

All of these jewels embedded within the ranging colours of the pre-sunrise skies, from the subtle blues higher up to the yellows and peach colours emerging near the horizon. How lovely to be able to stand and stare. I managed to take a quick photograph at 7:00am, just about showing the crescent, to remind me of the beauty of the scene. Another one for the diary.

Best wishes, Jeff. ​


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 12, 2018 2:54 pm 
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Joined: Sun May 11, 2008 6:11 pm
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Location: Portslade, Sussex Lat 50deg 51min Long 0deg 13mins West
Indeed Jeff! I was out this morning too, when you were, photographing the beautiful scene
of the crescent Moon with Earthshine and I also noticed that star xi 2 (37) in Sagittarius about half-a- degree to the right (west) of the Moon. At that time of the morning (0630-0640) Herring Gulls come back from the coast to feed inland at this time of the year, and these birds swirled around the Moon and appear on these photographs too. Skywatching = astronomy + birdwatching! regards maf


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 12, 2018 6:18 pm 
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Joined: Fri Dec 03, 2004 9:58 pm
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Location: Wellingborough
I just looked out n'eye at about 6am. Beautiful wasn't it :D

regards,

_________________
Brian
52.3N 0.6W
Wellingborough UK.

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PostPosted: Tue Feb 13, 2018 5:25 pm 
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Joined: Fri Dec 03, 2004 12:51 pm
Posts: 2514
Location: Stoke-on-Trent
Yes Brian, the n’eye views are sometimes the best, especially with yesterday’s sky.

Mike, I think I would class myself as a Skywatcher. There is such a lot to see. Quite often on the way home from work I look out for the regular spots where the buzzards reign, and watch them soar close by. Quite often, in the Summer, I’ll see their shadow close by me on the road as they fly overhead. I also occasionally get to see the gliders floating around, as I pass a local airfield.

I love watching the different cloud formations too. I’ve recently been reading Gavin Pretor-Pinney’s “The cloudspotter’s Guide”, which is a fascinating read.

Best wishes, Jeff.


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PostPosted: Wed Feb 14, 2018 2:02 pm 
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Joined: Sun May 11, 2008 6:11 pm
Posts: 3303
Location: Portslade, Sussex Lat 50deg 51min Long 0deg 13mins West
...and, of course I must add the various atmospheric optical phenomena like rainbows, haloes and sungods - ("whoops, should be sundogs!") etc, which seem to fall between astronomy and meteorology. Yesterday I came across an interesting book from the past by Fred Schaaf, "Seeing the Sky ; 100 Projects. Activities & Explorations in Astronomy" in a secondhand bookshop. Published by Wiley in 1990, I remember buying a copy then (but this copy is now long gone). In almost perfect condition, I invested £2 in it. Excellent for atmospheric effects and not too mathematical like a couple of others I have found. Re Buzzards...these more or less disappeared from the South Coast until fairly recently but now sometimes they can be seen from the Foredown Tower, circling high-up in the thermals on a warm sunny afternoon. A warm sunny afternoon, what a lovely thought! Currently it is a very cold, windy, grey and wet afternoon, and the only birds in sight are two bedraggled wood pigeons sitting on the fence. Keep looking up! regards maf


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