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PostPosted: Tue Oct 23, 2018 4:08 pm 
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Location: Macclesfield Cheshire
Here is a belated observation report from early October.

Before you read this report I want to make an observation.

I was attending the IAS at Stoneleigh. Whilst I was there spending some money. I noticed a number of Astro-retailers, were now focusing on selling Astro Imaging equipment rather than traditional visual observing equipment. I was sorry to see CCD and EAA equipment for sale, together with telescopes and filters aimed at the CCD imager. And not the large Dobs and Newtonian's we use.

I bought a 1.25" Omegon visual OIII filter and an 18mm Ultra Flat eyepiece from Altair. The filter wasn't easy to find amongst all the CCD filters available.


I am a CCD and DSLR imager, but I am currently the Worm that turned. And have started looking through a telescope again. That telescope is a Celestron C9.25 with a 2" Altair Prism diagonal.

I now have a modest selection of good eyepiece's.

24mm TV Panoptic
18mm Altair Flat Field
13mm Baader Hyperion
9mm Altair LightWave

Omegon OIII filter and Orion UltraBlock SCT filter.

Here is a brief report of observations made on Wednesday. The conditions were not perfect. The skies were brighter than normal so the NLM was +3.8. Eyepiece used- 24mm and 13mm with Orion UB filter on the scope.

57- Peg Yellow primary with a considerably fainter secondary. The secondary was very difficult to see. But with averted vision, it was visible during moments of steady seeing. 24mm then 13m ep used
Whilst making this observation Pegasus was still low in the East.

NGC 7331- With the 13mm. NGC 7331 was easy to see and identify. This was one of the first galaxies I found when I had my first goto telescope mount. and it still looks good. Only better now that I have more aperture.

NGC 7332- this one was difficult. It is a faint galaxy that really needs a darker sky. But I was able to observe it comfortably. I saw a bright core that gradually faded. At M+11 I was surprised to see it in my suburban sky.

NGC 7662- Blue Snowball Nebula. 13mm ep this was big, very bright and round. It looked like a planetary nebula through my eyepiece. And shining a brilliant white.

NGC 6826- The Blinking Planetary Nebula. This was another easy object to visually see using the 13mm and filter. It was smaller than the previous object but still quite distinct.

NGC 6891- Over the border in Delphinus. I found this little gem. NGC 6891 was small, bright and round in the 13mm. I last saw this object in the middle 1990's. So it was nice to go back and look at it with a modern eyepiece and more aperture.

NGC 7026- In Cygnus NGC 7026 was very small and faint. But despite the size. This magnitude 12 planetary was seen without averted vision. It was elongated in the 13mm. There is a magnitude 7 star very close to this nebula.

Whilst the telescope was pointed in this area. I homed in on NGC 6992. This time I used the 24mm Panoptic and was very surprised to see a long, but faint grey band of nebulosity.

I can honestly say. I enjoyed the evening at the eyepiece. And it made me realize how much I enjoyed visual observing. It was after all. What I did before getting into this digital malarky.


--
Regards
Paul A Brierley
Observing Director Macclesfield AS.

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PostPosted: Wed Oct 24, 2018 9:35 am 
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Location: Lancashire
Agreed Paul. It's more pleasing to some of us to look through the eyepiece and feel the physical intimacy of being at one with the instrument and object in view, rather than via a digital image on a screen, although digital has it's place.
Maybe we are just old-fashioned at preferring to stand at the open bow of our vessel, rather than sit in the cabin watching a screen. :wink: .

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PostPosted: Wed Oct 24, 2018 2:29 pm 
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I am neither a viewer or imager, I am a novice, and always will be, if anything I am a GOOD weather astronomer and prefer to sit in the warm with a Ha rather than freeze with a scope, but I have a couple as you can see.

I buy from the Widescreen centre, and have always had good advice on whatever i have wanted (and from other outlets).

But I do see that more and more magazines are filling with imaging rather than visual astronomy, and this is VERY annoying.

I do accept that many people image but many many many more do not, people buying their first scopes at Christmas, or for family, youngsters want to be able to look in a magazine and not see just Hubble type images, they, like me also want talk on eyepieces, mounts, scopes etc

I did attend a meeting where there was a seller, a well known one not mentioned who had NO filters at all except for CCDs

But that said I do like to sit in the warm, with this, remote focus, control and a gin and tonic sorry.


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Celestron 8" Edge HD Evolution, Esprit 120mm triplet, 72mm APO, Sky Tee 2, 6" reflecting scope, William Optics Binoviewer, Quark Daystar Ha Chromosphere on 72mm ED, LVW8mm eyepiece and Celestron 19mm Axiom, matched W.O 10 and 20mm, and a few others, D4s, D810,

For info, I am Autistic, Aspergers, ADHD, therefore if I come over as a little "short" on occasions it is not intended, thank you
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PostPosted: Fri Oct 26, 2018 9:04 pm 
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Location: Macclesfield Cheshire
skyhawk wrote:
I am neither a viewer or imager, I am a novice, and always will be, if anything I am a GOOD weather astronomer and prefer to sit in the warm with a Ha rather than freeze with a scope, but I have a couple as you can see.

I buy from the Widescreen centre, and have always had good advice on whatever i have wanted (and from other outlets).

But I do see that more and more magazines are filling with imaging rather than visual astronomy, and this is VERY annoying.

I do accept that many people image but many many many more do not, people buying their first scopes at Christmas, or for family, youngsters want to be able to look in a magazine and not see just Hubble type images, they, like me also want talk on eyepieces, mounts, scopes etc

I did attend a meeting where there was a seller, a well-known one not mentioned who had NO filters at all except for CCDs

But that said I do like to sit in the warm, with this, remote focus, control and a gin and tonic sorry.




There's nothing to be sorry about Skyhawk. A gin and tonic do sound very nice.
And I agree with everything you've said.
I too would like to see more visual stuff appearing in the popular UK Astronomy mags.

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PostPosted: Sat Oct 27, 2018 7:41 am 
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Location: Portslade, Sussex Lat 50deg 51min Long 0deg 13mins West
As one gets older, standing outside in the dark winter's cold for any length of time really does lose it's attraction, and with the exception of comets, I prefer to observe at dawn and dusk (crepuscular skywatching) and often even then through the window, with small spotting scopes. And using camera alone, photographing the Moon, atmospheric optical effects, like rainbows and haloes, etc. I keep no photographs in a computer-file, saving the very best as prints in albums and deleting the rest, and a written astronomical diary or journal. I find the daytime location of Venus to be an interesting pasttime. I prefer paper printed star atlases to computerised ones, although some Internet pages can be useful. Personally I cannot see any fun in using GOTO technology to find objects in the sky for me. Regards maf


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PostPosted: Sat Oct 27, 2018 9:57 am 
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Also I am sick of seeing Hubble type images, it would be good to see real images even once that you can expect to take not what are done by experienced imagers

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For info, I am Autistic, Aspergers, ADHD, therefore if I come over as a little "short" on occasions it is not intended, thank you


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PostPosted: Sat Oct 27, 2018 3:34 pm 
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Location: Portslade, Sussex Lat 50deg 51min Long 0deg 13mins West
I am inclined to agree with you...that "Pillars of Creation"' photograph/image should never ever appear in any book, magazine, calendar or newspaper again! Enough is enough! Regards maf.


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PostPosted: Sat Oct 27, 2018 3:45 pm 
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mike a feist wrote:
I am inclined to agree with you...that "Pillars of Creation"' photograph/image should never ever appear in any book, magazine, calendar or newspaper again! Enough is enough! Regards maf.


That is not what I implied and you know it

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Celestron 8" Edge HD Evolution, Esprit 120mm triplet, 72mm APO, Sky Tee 2, 6" reflecting scope, William Optics Binoviewer, Quark Daystar Ha Chromosphere on 72mm ED, LVW8mm eyepiece and Celestron 19mm Axiom, matched W.O 10 and 20mm, and a few others, D4s, D810,

For info, I am Autistic, Aspergers, ADHD, therefore if I come over as a little "short" on occasions it is not intended, thank you


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PostPosted: Sun Oct 28, 2018 7:02 am 
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However, with all the thousands upon thousands of images produced by Hubble Space Telescope, that particular photograph has become, for me, so horribly overused that I really meant what I wrote! Regards maf


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 29, 2018 8:18 am 
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Location: Galloway, SW Scotland
Hello Paul, good to hear from you again. I am also a great fan of visual astronomy. I find that watching a PC screen imparts a remoteness from whatever I am observing. Whereas, an eyepiece does the opposite for me.

NGC 7026? I couldn't find this on my star map, and I found that it is mag. 15 ish. Did you mean this nebula?

I have looked at NGC 7027, which is very nice. I use at least 300x, when the nebula is revealed as an egg shape with a rather `dusty' extremity.

Interesting that you see the Blue Snowball as white with your scope; it always appears very blue in my Newtonian.

I must look at NGC 6891, sometime. Thanks for the tip!

Best wishes,

Nigel

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PostPosted: Mon Oct 29, 2018 10:47 am 
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Digital imaging, with its ability to register the faintest of details in multiple wavelengths, has become an essential tool for making astrophysical discoveries.
On the other hand, back-yard/garden viewing through the eyepiece connects us intimately with the object under scrutiny. We view, say, a blazing star and know that the photons striking the retina are actually of the star, born deep in the stellar core and issuing at the surface to race across space for tens, hundreds, thousands or even millions of light years ( supernovae ), to finally enter our vision.

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PostPosted: Mon Oct 29, 2018 8:54 pm 
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nigeljoslin wrote:
Hello Paul, good to hear from you again. I am also a great fan of visual astronomy. I find that watching a PC screen imparts a remoteness from whatever I am observing. Whereas, an eyepiece does the opposite for me.

NGC 7026? I couldn't find this on my star map, and I found that it is mag. 15 ish. Did you mean this nebula?

I have looked at NGC 7027, which is very nice. I use at least 300x, when the nebula is revealed as an egg shape with a rather `dusty' extremity.

Interesting that you see the Blue Snowball as white with your scope; it always appears very blue in my Newtonian.

I must look at NGC 6891, sometime. Thanks for the tip!

Best wishes,

Nigel


It's interesting to read you're query regarding NGC 7026 observation. If it is that faint then I possibly made an error. I now have a dedicated OIII filter, so I will try again.

Thank you for making me aware.

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https://www.flickr.com/photos/paulabrierley/
http://pabastronomy.blogspot.co.uk/2018/


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PostPosted: Tue Oct 30, 2018 8:19 am 
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Hello again, Paul,

It may be that I owe you an apology. I have done some reading of forums and note that this nebula has an integrated apparent magnitude of 11 or 12 and should be visible in scopes of 10 inch aperture. This article is enlightening: https://observing.skyhound.com/archives ... _7026.html

That said, I failed to find it last night star-hopping with my 14 inch Dob. But, as we all know, these things can take several goes to find! And I'm not the most experienced of observers! Perhaps I need to try again with my OIII filter. Someone on one of the forums described how, with his 16 inch, he failed to find it, and on his second attempt had to increase the magnification greatly to find he was actually pointing straight at it.

I did find NGC 6905, however, nicely sandwiched between two stars and looking very nice, a palid blue. I ended up viewing it at 550x to see the central star and some structure. I then went on to view the Blinking Planetary at 400x, similar but brighter. I love these planetaries, especially the Blue Snowball.

Best wishes,

Nigel

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PostPosted: Wed Oct 31, 2018 6:51 am 
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No need for the apology Nigel.

It's good to know I (Might) have seen it.

It was very none stellar. Which suggested to me it was the Pn.

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