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 Post subject: Mercury transit
PostPosted: Mon Nov 11, 2019 11:38 am 
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Today, but be very careful with full solar observing precautions.

Cloudy here.

Regards,
David


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 Post subject: Re: Mercury transit
PostPosted: Mon Nov 11, 2019 12:53 pm 
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Location: Derby/Burton upon Trent
Just caught first contact here at Stafford in the 50mm binoculars

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 Post subject: Re: Mercury transit
PostPosted: Mon Nov 11, 2019 3:16 pm 
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I gave up after multiple attempts because of several cloud layers.

Used filtered Canon 10x30 IS Mk II.

About a decade ago? I saw a May Mercury transit in filtered 3x opera glass.
Mercury was a tiny black dot, which I followed across the Sun in clear skies.
Then 12.0 arcseconds.
This time 10.0 arcseconds.

At least I tried.

Regards,
David


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 Post subject: Re: Mercury transit
PostPosted: Mon Nov 11, 2019 4:04 pm 
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Been raining in Wales for months

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 Post subject: Re: Mercury transit
PostPosted: Mon Nov 11, 2019 4:15 pm 
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Location: Wellingborough
I caught the transit through variable cloud and some small patches of clear sky this afternoon at ~14.20UTC. Using my 102/500mm refractor with Baader Solar Film Filter and 25mm Plossl eyepiece, Mercury was a small black spot, at that time about 2/3 the way from the farther solar limb. No sunspots were seen, it being a deep minimum at the moment.

This is the 3rd transit of Mercury I have observed and/or imaged this century. I count myself very fortunate :D

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 Post subject: Re: Mercury transit
PostPosted: Mon Nov 11, 2019 7:33 pm 
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Joined: Thu Dec 09, 2004 7:34 pm
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Location: Gt.Notley, Essex
I had just about given up any hope of seeing the transit when the skies cleared sufficiently around 2:15 this afternoon to give me a clear view through my 80mm short focus Celestion 'scope with Baader film filter and around X40 mag., I had been trying since around 12:30 but was constantly thwarted by menacing dark cloud constantly obscuring the view just as I was about to focus on the Sun. When I eventually was able to do so I was rather surprised to see how small Mercury was. I managed to see the last transit three or four years ago and distinctly remember being able to see it without any difficulty at all. I was able to track it for another hour before the houses opposite got in the way. By that time it was pretty low anyway. Pleased to have seen it though. I think the next one is in 2032! Paul F.


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 Post subject: Re: Mercury transit
PostPosted: Mon Nov 11, 2019 8:47 pm 
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Joined: Fri Dec 03, 2004 12:51 pm
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Location: Stoke-on-Trent
I was very pleasantly surprised this afternoon at being able to observe the transit, through brief clear moments in the cloud.

I arrived home just before 2:00pm, and within a few minutes of setting up had my first clear view that lasted for about 5 minutes. I was almost ecstatic at seeing it. Many years ago I created a home made solar filter, from Baader solar filter film, for my 66mm William Optics refractor. It has served me well and is still in excellent condition. So with my filter in place I acquired the sun, using a low power eyepiece, within a minute or so. Then I switched to a 12.7mm Plossl, which I think gave me approximately 30x magnification, for a more detailed view.

Two things always strike me about a Mercury transit; the first is the realisation of how tiny, and yet sharp, Mercury’s disc appears against the behemoth that is the Sun; the second is a sense of looking out across the vastness of space into the centre of our solar system. It’s a super event to observe.

Of the many images I tried to capture, this one, caught during a period of patchy cloud cover, turned out to be the best. You’ll need a clean screen and a bit of zoom to see it.

The final observation I will make is that I love sky watching. I will never tire of looking up. I just wish I was able to make more time for it. Congratulations to all who witnessed it. Definitely one for the diary.

Best wishes, Jeff.


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 Post subject: Re: Mercury transit
PostPosted: Tue Nov 12, 2019 9:33 am 
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Location: Galloway, SW Scotland
I gave up because of intermittent cloud finally clearing once the sun started to dip and hide behind a tree!

It's a frustrating hobby, at times! :cry:

Glad a couple of you managed it, anyway. I had blue sky for the last one in May 2016.


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 Post subject: Re: Mercury transit
PostPosted: Tue Nov 12, 2019 10:58 am 
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Location: Greenwich, London
Well done Jeff.

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 Post subject: Re: Mercury transit
PostPosted: Tue Nov 12, 2019 12:09 pm 
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Location: Portslade, Sussex Lat 50deg 51min Long 0deg 13mins West
The Transit of Mercury : 11/11/19 : 12.40hrs - 15.50hrs
Observed from the Viewing Gallery of the Foredown Tower, Portslade. Used the simple projection method with a Mighty Midget 52mm spotting scope with a straight eyepiece, mounted on a tripod. A shade was fixed around the eyepiece end and card screen mounted on as separate tripod. Viewing was through the window as it was very windy outside. The sky was generally clear although passing cumulus cloud gradually built up towards the end.
The screen was adjusted so the solar image (about 14cms across) was large enough to give a reasonable view without being too faint. Even then Mercury was tiny, less than a millimetre across but there were no sunspots at all to cause any confusion.
This tiny spot was first located at 12.40hrs as it had just started to transit and thereafter rough positions / times were noted at 13.00, 13.27, 13.55, 14.12, 14.20, and 14.47hrs. At 15.17hrs it was nearest to maximum immersion and near the centre of the disc of the Sun. In between times the Sun was periodically covered by passing clouds and these increased as the transit progressed. Good views were had at 15.25hrs, 15.50 and finally at about 16.00hrs. After that the Sun itself was lost in a bank of cloud near to the sea horizon, at about 16.08hrs.
Therefore three hours of good but intermittent observing was had. This was only the third Mercury Transit I have experienced, the others being on 7th May 2003 (when the complete transit was followed) and 9th May 2016 (when just a few glimpses were had). All three were observed from the Foredown Tower, in Portslade. This time I observed with David I. and John D., who used different techniques and their own instruments. maf


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 Post subject: Re: Mercury transit
PostPosted: Tue Nov 12, 2019 8:10 pm 
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Location: Derby/Burton upon Trent
Great photo Jeff, just like it was in the binos

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 Post subject: Re: Mercury transit
PostPosted: Thu Nov 14, 2019 3:46 pm 
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Location: Surrey
I observed the transit from Carshalton on the edge of London. Best described as Sunny Intervals. Used a Canon 70D with a 300mm telephoto lens and a Thousand Oaks solar filter. It was very difficult to focus. I am not sure if it was the solar filter confusing the auto-focus or else the turbulance from the heating in the houses I was observing over.

Still I got to see it - that makes 3 transits of Mercury and 2 of Venus so far.

I see someone managed a double transit from Chilie - Mercury & the ISS at the same time. Makes me jealous !

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 Post subject: Re: Mercury transit
PostPosted: Thu Nov 14, 2019 6:17 pm 
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Location: Portslade, Sussex Lat 50deg 51min Long 0deg 13mins West
Of the two possible Transits of Venus in my lifetime, the first was great here..and the second was a complete cloud-out! Regards maf


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 Post subject: Re: Mercury transit
PostPosted: Sat Nov 16, 2019 8:49 pm 
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Location: Gt.Notley, Essex
Same here in Essex Mike.
Paul F.


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 Post subject: Re: Mercury transit
PostPosted: Sun Nov 17, 2019 8:05 am 
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Location: Portslade, Sussex Lat 50deg 51min Long 0deg 13mins West
Here in Sussex we were extremely lucky to see the Transit of Mercury this time. Since that day the weather here, as mostly everywhere, was been horribly anti-skywatching! Cloud and atmospheric optical phenomena watching has not been much good either : all the garden birds seem to have disappeared into the nearby countryside and as for showing the camera obscura at the Foredown Tower to visitors...forget it! Still it could be worse - NSW Australia and California are in flames and parts of Italy and England are completely flooded. Regards, a grey, or gray, maf.


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