Solarscope's Solarview 50 - first light images...

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DigitalSky
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Solarscope's Solarview 50 - first light images...

Post by DigitalSky »

Hi all,

I currently have the use of a Solarscope Solarview 50 solar telescope. Here are a couple of first light images...

http://www.digitalsky.org.uk/solar/2008 ... ha_800.jpg

http://www.digitalsky.org.uk/solar/2008 ... -alpha.jpg
Best regards,

Pete Lawrence
http://www.digitalsky.org.uk
Kaustav
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method?

Post by Kaustav »

Pretty and amazing shots. I love solar photographs like this. Post some more if you have em. Are you capturing these using a webcam and then stacking in Registax or our you taking multiple long exposure subs and stacking in Deepspace Stacker or some other method?

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goodtime
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Post by goodtime »

Great images Pete, lovely detail.

On that scope, does it just use the Ha filter or is there something more?
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BrianP
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Post by BrianP »

No such technical questions from me just to say awesome shots.

May get a solar filter one day but until then happy to look at others work.

One question though. When viewing through a scope or monitor can you actually see activity? Hope that's not too daft a question.
Regards

Brian Pomeroy
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Earthshine
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Post by Earthshine »

BrianP wrote:No such technical questions from me just to say awesome shots.

May get a solar filter one day but until then happy to look at others work.

One question though. When viewing through a scope or monitor can you actually see activity? Hope that's not too daft a question.
You can make your own solar filter (a white light filter) for your normal scope using Baader Solar Filter Paper - about £15 for an A4 sheet, and some black card, glue and Duct tape.

However you won't see images like these. You will see any sunspots, but you are unlikely to see granulation and you won't see solar flares unless you get an H-Alpha filter or a dedicated H-Alpha scope. The cheapest filter is about £600. The cheapest scope is the Coronado PST which retails at about £400. The top-range ones can cost as much as £8500.
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Post by sparkymark »

How quick do the prominences look through the eyepiece??
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Earthshine
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Post by Earthshine »

sparkymark wrote:How quick do the prominences look through the eyepiece??
I don't know yet. I'm still waiting for mine. Bear in mind that these solar flares can be multiple earth diameters in size. :shock:
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Post by Eclipse »

Earthshine wrote: You can make your own solar filter (a white light filter) for your normal scope using Baader Solar Filter Paper - about £15 for an A4 sheet, and some black card, glue and Duct tape.
I did exactly that, but all I saw was a plain white disc, quite featureless - rather disappointing.

So I have just ordered a Coronado PST.

And those pics are brilliant - well done, just what I want to see.
Coronado PST with SME-40 double stack H@ filter
DigitalSky
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Post by DigitalSky »

Crikey, lots of questions...

Kaustav: I am imaging with a Lumenera SKYnyx 2-0M camera. Basically an industrial strength webcam capable of capturing 60fps at full size (640x480) uncompressed. About 300 frames captured for prominences and 600-1000 for surface detail. Once captured, I process the images in Registax.

Goodtime: The scope uses a H-alpha filter which is screwed onto the front of the optical tube.

Brian/Sparkymark: Not sure what you consider activity but the answer is most probably yes. When you look at the Sun through an instrument like this you can see all of the features shown in images. Big proms and energetic active regions do alter quite quickly but it's not easy to perceive real time changes. The exception is with flares which can brighten and fade before your very eyes, but such views aren't that common. Here's an animation of prominence activity taken with my PST:
http://www.digitalsky.org.uk/solar/ha-20060511.html

Here's a full disk crossing (Calcium-K) of an active region to show you the sort of changes you can get over several days:
http://www.digitalsky.org.uk/solar/2007 ... 3_slow.gif
Best regards,

Pete Lawrence
http://www.digitalsky.org.uk
Earthshine
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Post by Earthshine »

DigitalSky wrote:Crikey, lots of questions...

Kaustav: I am imaging with a Lumenera SKYnyx 2-0M camera. Basically an industrial strength webcam capable of capturing 60fps at full size (640x480) uncompressed. About 300 frames captured for prominences and 600-1000 for surface detail. Once captured, I process the images in Registax.

Goodtime: The scope uses a H-alpha filter which is screwed onto the front of the optical tube.

Brian/Sparkymark: Not sure what you consider activity but the answer is most probably yes. When you look at the Sun through an instrument like this you can see all of the features shown in images. Big proms and energetic active regions do alter quite quickly but it's not easy to perceive real time changes. The exception is with flares which can brighten and fade before your very eyes, but such views aren't that common. Here's an animation of prominence activity taken with my PST:
http://www.digitalsky.org.uk/solar/ha-20060511.html

Here's a full disk crossing (Calcium-K) of an active region to show you the sort of changes you can get over several days:
http://www.digitalsky.org.uk/solar/2007 ... 3_slow.gif
Can you see anything through a CaK PST? I believe some people find it difficult, or just see nothing at all, and just use them for imaging.
DigitalSky
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Post by DigitalSky »

I can see a purple/blue disk and if there are any active regions on the Sun, I can make out where they are. However, I can't see them in any detail like you would though a hydrogen-alpha PST. The Calcium-K PST is IMO, primarily an imaging scope.
Best regards,

Pete Lawrence
http://www.digitalsky.org.uk
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