Finding the Pole Star (degrees of elevation)

Don't be shy! If you're just starting out, here's the place to ask that first question

Moderators: joe, Brian, Guy Fennimore

Eclipse
Posts: 917
Joined: Wed Mar 09, 2005 7:44 pm
Location: Costa Blanca, Spain 37.963N 0.738W
Contact:

Re:

Post by Eclipse »

Deimos wrote:
Spike wrote:Am I right in saying that 1 degree is approximately 70 miles?
Depends what sort of miles you are talking about. If you start thinking about Nautical Miles it gets a lot easier (again approximately as there are slight variations) but 1 deg =(approx.) 60 Nautical miles

Ian
Isn´t 1 degree of latitude EXACTLY 60 nautical miles? A nautical mile being defined as one minute of latitude - I seem to remember it was when I was in the Royal Navy - OK a long time ago.
Coronado PST with SME-40 double stack H@ filter
Ric
Posts: 9
Joined: Thu Apr 09, 2009 1:17 pm
Contact:

Re: Finding the Pole Star (degrees of elevation)

Post by Ric »

David Frydman wrote:They should work as it is suggested Thuban was the Pole star around 2787 BC.
I don't know how accurate this is.
Polaris has been our Pole star for quite a while, maybe centuries. So it might be the same for Thuban.
Thanks David.

The 18th century antiquary William Stukeley recorded a North Star alignment at Neolithic Avebury. I retraced Stukeley's steps and discovered he had been sighting along Stone F which sloped up at 51 degrees.

http://www.avebury-web.co.uk/the_cove/IMAG017.JPG

Avebury was a stone age observatory - primarily for the observation of the rising sun at different seasons throughout the year.

But the North Star [Thuban] discovery means that the builders of Avebury had determined the earth's axis over four thousand years ago.

I wrote about this here: http://www.the-marian-cipher.com

Many thanks,

Ric
David Frydman
Posts: 5360
Joined: Mon Jan 18, 2010 9:25 am
Contact:

Re: Finding the Pole Star (degrees of elevation)

Post by David Frydman »

One degree of latitude is one nautical mile, but it varies slightly as the Earth is approximately an oblate spheroid.
It is not perfectly spherical.
Also aircraft use nautical miles but as they are flying 7 miles up again their nautical miles are not quite surface nautical miles.
It depends what accuracy you want.
GPS use more refined measures.

Regards, David
Ric
Posts: 9
Joined: Thu Apr 09, 2009 1:17 pm
Contact:

Re: Finding the Pole Star (degrees of elevation)

Post by Ric »

Thus it seems that the Avebury People were also using the North Star and associated polar constellations as a seasonal 'clock' and as a revolving cosmology ;)

Ric
Post Reply