How do these work?

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Zeke
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How do these work?

Post by Zeke »

Simple question, may be a simple answer:
http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Celestron-UPC ... 4abd5c72e8
Never worry!
Konus 500.
8x30 binos.
Canon EOS 1000F.
Tamron 80-210mm telephoto.
Fujifinepix S1000fd.
http://coriantumr.wordpress.com/
Meade ETX 80
Bizibilder
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Re: How do these work?

Post by Bizibilder »

They would be set to focus at infinity - which for all practical purposes would be around 50 feet or more. Personally, I would not go for this type of binocular.

There are two things you should look for: Firstly you should be able to focus the binocular - you will not always be looking at "infinity". Even for Astro (where everything is at infinity) you may still need to adjust the binocular for your own eyes. Secondly you should buy a pair that have individual eyepiece adjustment (usually only on one of the eyepieces). Your eyes are unlikely to be perfectly matched and therefore you need to be able to compensate for this by adjusting the binoculars for your own eyes - once done then the general focus takes over for near and far objects.

You can buy perfectly serviceable binoculars with these features for the same money (or less!). Don't forget that you are also paying for the branding and the fact that these are specifically "astro" binoculars. IMHO nothing more than sales "puff" to get you to part with your money.

I have a pair of 10x50 binoculars that work very well - I bought them from Lidl (discount supermarket) for around £15. You should certainly be able to get branded 10x50's for under £40 for a decent pair if you shop around a bit.
Bizibilder
Norfolk UK

Blog: http://bizibilder.blogspot.com/
David Frydman
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Re: How do these work?

Post by David Frydman »

Basically, fixed focus binoculars are for those who are young and have a lot of eye accommodation and also don't need to wear glasses.
There are military glasses such as the British Avimo, 7 x 42 I think, which are fixed focus but have a very large eye relief so glasses can be worn.
With contact lenses the Celestron 8 x 40 fixed focus may be O.K. for those who need eye correction.
Generally these cheap Celestron, Lidl, Aldi etc are rather basic. I don't like them, but many do.
The 8 x 40 Nikon Action VII is much better, used to be £59.99 at Jessops, but others may have them at a similar price. They are wide field and generally more robust.
However, because fixed focus are so simple they can be easily waterproofed and are easier to keep collimated.
It is essential you try any fixed focus binocular to see if you can use it.
If the centre is good for infinity the lower part of the field is usually good for 20 ft because of the curved field eyepieces.
So they maybe o.k. and whatever you try buy the one you test not a boxed untested one, and try to buy from a shop rather than mail order.

regards, David

Picstop are a good firm, I have used them for many years mainly for memory cards, but also Hama screen protectors and special offers. My Canon A720 is on its 6th or 8th screen protector, but it has taken 170,000 photos and the underlying screen is unmarked.

BASICALLY if you don't need glasses at all and are young and have a lot of accommodation this 8 x 40 Celestron fixed focus may be quite o.k. for you.
Zeke
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Re: How do these work?

Post by Zeke »

Thank you for that very comprehensive information.
They aren't for me, they would have been for my son who is researching a suitable pair of binoculars.
He didn't really want this particular type but he and I were not sure how they worked.
He does have a problem with his left eye with, frankly, doesn't work.
For that reason alone I suggested a monocular but I will keep you informed of his final choice!
Never worry!
Konus 500.
8x30 binos.
Canon EOS 1000F.
Tamron 80-210mm telephoto.
Fujifinepix S1000fd.
http://coriantumr.wordpress.com/
Meade ETX 80
David Frydman
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Joined: Mon Jan 18, 2010 9:25 am
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Re: How do these work?

Post by David Frydman »

If his right eye is neutral and he has a lot of accommodation it could work.
He should though go to a shop, maybe late evening when it is darker and try several binoculars or indeed monoculars.
The old Russian 8 x 30 monocular is good, but uncommon nowadays.
There are modern 10 x 50 and higher mag monoculars, and a lot of cheap ones such as 10 x 25, which are a bit dim.

Good luck with your search.

regards, David

You might find something in a charity shop.
Block the left side or cut a binocular in half.
Look out for fungus, take a strong torch look through the front.
brian livesey
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Re: How do these work?

Post by brian livesey »

Looking through the front of monoculars/binoculars before purchase is good advice David :D . I once saw a pair of nice looking, secondhand, ROSS bins ( I forget the spec, but they were quite big ) in the front window of a local photo-shop.
I looked through the big ends first and saw that one of the prisms was splintered :shock: , so the bins had obviously been dropped or given a severe knock. Inspection through the big ends reveals practically all: damaged/unaligned prisms, thumb prints, dust, fungi, mites, etc.
Apart from damage to the prism, the ROSS glass was in pristine condition. Pity.
brian
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