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 Post subject: Help
PostPosted: Sat Dec 26, 2015 2:17 pm 
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Joined: Sat Dec 26, 2015 2:09 pm
Posts: 3
Hi guys, please help, i have received a Celestron PS1000 Telescope after years of wanting one, i love to look at the sky and as we live in the country the sky can be very clear. So i have no idea now what i am doing, the instructions are not very clear at all, it is set up on its stand and that is as far as it goes, if anyone can help, i would really appreciate it. :oops:


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 Post subject: Re: Help
PostPosted: Sun Dec 27, 2015 1:27 pm 
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Joined: Mon Jan 18, 2010 9:25 am
Posts: 5333
Hi there and welcome.

First the bad news.
You have I think chosen an equatorial mount, which for beginners makes life complicated.
Basically you have to know your latitude and set it up.

Do you have a local astro club to help?

Look at FAS,Federation of astro societies I think somewhere here or just Google.

To start look at the Moon with 20mm eyepiece or 50x.
I think this scope is unusual, being f/8 but short, so must use a barlow.
Forget the 3x barlow and 4mm eyepiece Far too high magnification.

During the day align the scope with finder at 50x using something a mile away.

Never look at the Sun.

Regards, David


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 Post subject: Re: Help
PostPosted: Sun Dec 27, 2015 6:32 pm 
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Joined: Fri Oct 10, 2014 8:12 am
Posts: 121
Location: earby lancs
Is the scope a go-to mount and dose it have a polar scope I stated last year with an eq5 mount and not looked back since I got my head round it I got some good advice from here and there are videos on Utube that will help how far have you got so far do be careful as if you have spirit level in the mount it may be wrong I have a small spirit level and check all three legs are level if I can help in any way just let me know and I'll try and help in segments as it can be mind boggling when you get loads of info all at once

_________________
Skywatcher 200p explorer EQ5 mount synscan upgrade kit
Nikon D3100


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 Post subject: Re: Help
PostPosted: Sun Dec 27, 2015 6:44 pm 
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Joined: Fri Dec 03, 2004 9:58 pm
Posts: 3628
Location: Wellingborough
Hi Marabella and welcome.

To get you started with understanding and then using your new telescope here are a few links to help on the internet. In particular there are lots of videos on Youtube which will walk you through solving many of the problems you might encounter as you get going.

How to use an equatorial mounting not unlike yours:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F7HVDKAZ6eM
How to set the mounting up accurately
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=plx6XXDgf2E

On the pages from these Youtube links you will find lots more information videos which I'm sure will be of use :D

Also use Google :
https://www.google.co.uk/webhp?rls=ig&g ... pe+youtube

Other links worth looking at are for instance:

Simple polar alignment:
http://www.astro-baby.com/simplepolar/s ... gnment.htm

Celestron manuals for Powerseeker telescopes:
http://www.celestron.com/c3/images/file ... erinst.pdf
(In several languages, English is the first)

Have a look through some of these links and then please come back to us with your questions. We will be really pleased to help,

Kind regards,

_________________
Brian
52.3N 0.6W
Wellingborough UK.

254mm LX90 on Superwedge, WO ZS66SD, Helios 102mm f5 on EQ1, Hunter 11x80, Pentax 10x50
ASI120MC Toucam Pros 740k/840k/900nc mono, Pentax K110D
Ro-Ro roof shed


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 Post subject: Re: Help
PostPosted: Tue Dec 29, 2015 10:58 am 
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Joined: Sat Dec 26, 2015 2:09 pm
Posts: 3
Thank you everyone, i will make a start, as yet what with xmas and having my kids to stay i haven't done anything so over the next few days i will give this a go, thanks for the links etc, i will start having a look, i did buy a couple of books, stargazing 2016 and a star chart but i thought surely the moon has to be the easiest to get to grips with or am i wrong in thinking this?? Again i will try all the above and let you know how i am getting on, plus i have joined the SPA, any help and all that lol. Thanks though. K :wink:


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 Post subject: Re: Help
PostPosted: Tue Dec 29, 2015 2:16 pm 
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Joined: Mon Jan 18, 2010 9:25 am
Posts: 5333
The Moon and Jupiter are the easiest to start with.

Regards, David


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 Post subject: Re: Help
PostPosted: Tue Dec 29, 2015 4:05 pm 
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Joined: Fri Dec 03, 2004 9:58 pm
Posts: 3628
Location: Wellingborough
Congrats on joining the SPA :D

If you go to the SPA homepage (see the links at the top of the Forum pages) you will find a lot of helpful info under "Help and advice", such as "Starting to use your new telescope" by Robin Scagell:
http://www.popastro.com/help/help.php?t ... g=Starting to Use Your Telescope

Do have a browse there,

Regards,

_________________
Brian
52.3N 0.6W
Wellingborough UK.

254mm LX90 on Superwedge, WO ZS66SD, Helios 102mm f5 on EQ1, Hunter 11x80, Pentax 10x50
ASI120MC Toucam Pros 740k/840k/900nc mono, Pentax K110D
Ro-Ro roof shed


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 Post subject: Re: Help
PostPosted: Tue Dec 29, 2015 7:10 pm 
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Joined: Fri Oct 10, 2014 8:12 am
Posts: 121
Location: earby lancs
There are a few apps on Google play store like sky portal and stellarium mobile they helped me find my way round the night sky

_________________
Skywatcher 200p explorer EQ5 mount synscan upgrade kit
Nikon D3100


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 Post subject: Re: Help
PostPosted: Sat Jan 02, 2016 10:26 am 
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Joined: Sat Dec 26, 2015 2:09 pm
Posts: 3
Thank you everyone when i manage to find something other than the field opposite my house i will share my joy on here ;-)


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 Post subject: Re: Help
PostPosted: Thu Jan 07, 2016 4:32 am 
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Joined: Tue Jan 05, 2016 2:24 am
Posts: 5
Hi, Marabella. You got some very good answers already. The equitorial mount can be a dream once you have learned how to use it. Your mobile phone is likely to have your exact latitude and longitude. On my I-Phone I go to the Compass app. Wherever I am it gives me the exact degrees, minutes and seconds of latitude (and longitude). Once you have set your mount to the exact latitude, any single sky object can be tracked all night long by turning your mount on only one axis. (The other basic mount, called the altazimuth, has to zig and zag on two axes to track one object.) If you get a clock-drive motor, the one-axis tracking is automatic, and ideal for long-exposure photography (great for faint or deep-space objects). The camera gathers more light over time than your eye, and does not suffer eye fatigue.

Even without a camera and motor, one-axis tracking only requires you to push the scope along to keep the object in the field of view (FOV). A star or planet will pass across the entire FOV in a few minutes. The exact time to cross the FOV depends on your eyepiece.

To get an idea of how the stars revolve about the north celestial pole (for all practical purposes, the North Star), you can google a picture of time lapse photography. Go to Google, select images, type in "time lapse stars" and voila.


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