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 Post subject: Where to Look
PostPosted: Sun Jan 26, 2020 2:41 pm 
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Joined: Wed May 10, 2017 9:18 am
Posts: 10
I know about star-hopping and have been quite successful at finding deep sky objects with a pair of 10x50 binoculars but i have trouble doing the same with a telescope. The problem is that with a 6x30 finder scope I have difficulty identifying the correct star from which to start hopping. This is especially true when trying to find stars high up in the sky, as with low altitude objects I can sometimes line up the telescope using "line of sight".

If anyone has any tricks or tips that would assist me, they would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks


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 Post subject: Re: Where to Look
PostPosted: Sun Jan 26, 2020 10:20 pm 
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Joined: Mon Jan 18, 2010 9:25 am
Posts: 5333
Hi Joop,
Depending on your telescope, I would use the lowest magnification, widest field eyepiece on the scope itself, and find a bright star with that.

The 6x30 is too small to show much unless you have very dark skies.

Or try to use the 10x50 binocular and then get the same place in low power on the telescope.

Whatever method, the starting star must be bright enough to be easily seen.

My 123mm f/5 refractor had eyepieces from 16x with a 4.7 degree field, to 145x.
I found hundreds of deep sky objects with that.
It has no finder.
The scope is the finder.

I used the Astro cards to find faint objects. There may be a digital version nowadays.
They very accurately shows deep sky objects.
Messier objects and further sets for other objects.
Saw some on Astromart.
They enable objects more than one magnitude fainter to be found than using a star atlas, as the position is so accurate in relation to the star field.

Regards,
David


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 Post subject: Re: Where to Look
PostPosted: Mon Jan 27, 2020 8:04 am 
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Joined: Tue Jan 14, 2020 7:27 am
Posts: 48
As you wrote, "This is especially true when trying to find stars high up in the sky."
Indeed this is very true. Even when trying to locate something quite obvious and high up, and using a refracting scope with an angled eyepiece, one always seems to misjudge the angle. Individual stars do tend to look alike and it is very easy to get it wrong. Pairs or triangles or even small asterism are a better choice if nearby your final target. [Using a refractor with a straight eyepiece high up is a real neck killer!].
As David advised, start with lowest power first. Also you need, as he also said, charts that show stars fainter that the object being you are searching for. Often maps in magazines pointing out the location of an asteroid or comet for example fail in this respect.
I have a number of star atlases with a limiting magnitude of about 9th, and if looking for something quite faint I plot them on one of these. Of course galaxies are already thereon, but the pattern of faint triangles pairs, lines etc help to confirm that you have not lost your way. regards maf


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 Post subject: Re: Where to Look
PostPosted: Mon Jan 27, 2020 10:22 am 
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Joined: Tue Dec 05, 2017 11:53 am
Posts: 555
WHY do suppliers of scopes still give people rubbish finders, I prefer a tube assembly and then ADD what I want, get a red dot finder

£14 from China or buy re badged in the UK for £40, I have three of these and they are Celestron/Skywatcher etc re named

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/4-Reticle-Re ... 0005.m1851

Also

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Telescope-Fi ... SwRDJcQey9


and this allows you to add both

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Multifunctio ... Sw6GJd9Maj

_________________
Celestron 8" Edge HD Evolution, Esprit 120mm triplet, 72mm APO, Sky Tee 2, 6" reflecting scope, William Optics Binoviewer, Quark Daystar Ha Chromosphere on 72mm ED, LVW8mm eyepiece and Celestron 19mm Axiom, matched W.O 10 and 20mm, and a few others, D4s, D810,

For info, I am Autistic, Aspergers, ADHD, therefore if I come over as a little "short" on occasions it is not intended, thank you


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 Post subject: Re: Where to Look
PostPosted: Mon Jan 27, 2020 12:13 pm 
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Joined: Wed May 10, 2017 9:18 am
Posts: 10
Thanks for all the advice. I'll get a decent star atlas and a better finder scope and make more use of asterisms to find some feint fuzzies.

Clear skies

Joop


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