hi im a newbie on a really low budget(ADDED SOME SUGGESTIONS

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leanneblues
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hi im a newbie on a really low budget(ADDED SOME SUGGESTIONS

Post by leanneblues »

hi there

i have about £%0-£60 to spend and after reading posts i know thats not alot of money but want to get something any ideas what etelscope i can get to look at stars and moon and maybe planets too,just intrested in learnig a little more not really to learn in any great depth but just to be bale to see more than with the unaided eye and be able to go WOW!!! (yep typical woman

thanks for any advice
Last edited by leanneblues on Thu Aug 16, 2007 7:27 pm, edited 1 time in total.
barf
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Post by barf »

hi,

with only £60 i think scopes are a bit out of reach. Dont be tempted by the cheap rubbish in places like makro, or jessops, or on ebay. Save up for something decent from a proper telescope supplier,

I would advise you buy a decent pair of binoculars, and a good book guide to the night sky. Find your way about and learn the constellations by unaided eye, and use the binos for some of the more dim objects and the moon (the plaiades is lovelly in binos) (cant spell it!). Many things can be seen unaided eye, meteors and satellites etc, and the binos will bring in many interesting objects, and of course are fully portable.

but most important is a good guide book and to spend the time looking. Then save up for a scope, there are some good ones that wont cost you too much more £150-200. Take the time to read other posts in this section for advice


Martin
mapofthedead
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Post by mapofthedead »

Definitely go with a pair of binoculars. I don't know much about them with regards as what to get, but there are some very experienced observers here who will be able to give you a guiding hand :)

Welcome to the forums :D
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66mm F/5.9 William Optics Refractor
leanneblues
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Post by leanneblues »

what about this

http://www.scopesnskies.com/prod/bresse ... scope.html

or this

http://www.scopesnskies.com/prod/Bresse ... ius70.html

or this

http://www.scopesnskies.com/prod/Bresse ... /RB60.html

or this

http://www.scopesnskies.com/prod/Bresse ... B60nc.html

are any of these any good at all??? or which one is the best and will i be able to see ANYTHIng??? from these


thanks
agentgonzo
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Post by agentgonzo »

I picked up a set of 7x50 bins from a camera shop on the high street (was in a hurry) for £60 and they are pretty good. You'll be able to get a better deal online, but for a low budget, definitely go with bins rather than a scope.
beamer3.6m
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Post by beamer3.6m »

I would suggest the Celestron 15 x 70 binnoculars.

These have a 70mm objective lens so are as good as any 70mm telescope, if not better as you have basically got two lenses (one for each eye).

I believe that they sell for about £70.00 but I suggest you also get a basic camera tripod which you can pick up from Argos or Tesco for about £5.00 as you will be surpised how much the view will wobble when holding them for a long while.

A decent pair of binocculars are better than a cheap scope anf will last you forever as you will always use them even when you evetually get a scope to help you find things or for travel viewing.
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Jade
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Post by Jade »

leanneblues wrote:what about this

http://www.scopesnskies.com/prod/bresse ... scope.html

or this

http://www.scopesnskies.com/prod/Bresse ... ius70.html

or this

http://www.scopesnskies.com/prod/Bresse ... /RB60.html

or this

http://www.scopesnskies.com/prod/Bresse ... B60nc.html

are any of these any good at all??? or which one is the best and will i be able to see ANYTHIng??? from these


thanks
The scopes are ok but you're better off buying some binoculars as everyone else has said. If you do want a scope then it's best to save up and get something a little better. You can get some decent scopes from about £125. Cheap scopes usually produce blurry images which are useless when trying to get a good view of something. If you do want a scope then I recommend this: http://www.firstlightoptics.com/proddet ... od=s1145pm It's £125 but it's pretty decent and the best cheap scope I've seen. It was recommended to me when I was looking for a cheap scope.
MNuTz
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Post by MNuTz »

Can i just ask what peoples opinions are of the Bresser Skylux as a starter scope?

It is a 70mm refractor, comes with a 20mm, 12mm and a 4mm eye pieces and has favourable reviews for a cheap scope.

mine cost the g/f just under a £100 BUT LIDL supermarket occasionally do them for just £50.

http://www.astroman.fsnet.co.uk/skylux.htm
I could try to describe the feelings you get from looking up at the stars, but i would fail.
Jade
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Post by Jade »

Well it's a good cheap scope and good for a starter scope. But then it depends what you're looking for. What are you intending to use it for??
brian livesey
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Post by brian livesey »

I bought the Bresser SKYLUX and it gives astigmatic star images. That's the risk with buying cheap, mass produced, refractors: it's 50/50 as to whether the optics are good or not .
brian
pg8
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Post by pg8 »

:D I strted with a 4 inch reflector from Jessops and it was a wow for me and I still have it 3 years later and wouldn't change. But I too am on a very low budget and have 10 x 50 bins which are 25 years old and a bit hard to handle but still great to find things for yourself on manual without all this go to computer driven high rez stuff. If the money just aint there!
goodtime
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Post by goodtime »

Hi everyone,

I figured I should add my 2 cents to this discussion.

A good pair of binocs is an excellent way to start, 7x50s will do very well and won't need a tripod. Binocs have the advantage that what you see through them is oriented the same as seen by the unaided eye. Also get a red flashlight so you can look at your star maps and not ruin your night vision. Binocs make it much simpler to learn the constellations and major sights.

But I also think that if you can afford it, picking up a small scope, no smaller than 70mm refractor or 100mm reflector, is also a good way to go. Get something reasonable, but that doesn't mean expensive, try to minimize the plastic. Get one with an equatorial mount and you can learn about the celestial coordinates. There are a number of scopes in the £50 to £100 range that would do. Treat your first scope as a learning experience.

Just my opinion....
Andrew
Eyes, binoculars, CubePro, AT72ED, EOS 20Da, DSI II Pro,

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Hugh
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Post by Hugh »

If you looking for cheap bins, try the following link to this subject on the S@N forum: -

here

They might only be £20, but they are fantastic bins. I've got a pair and ue them for birding, but they are exceptionally good for astronomy as well!
Hugh

TAL 2M reflector, 150mm (6"), 1,200mm f/8; Soligor 152mm (6"), 750mm f/5; Bresser 10x50 and Opticron 8x42 bins (and desperate for clear skies!)
Mike Feist
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Post by Mike Feist »

I am inclined to advise against 7 x 50 binos. I have tried thet on a couple of occassions but although they are light and easy to hold still ,faint items get lost in the sky lit by light pollution. 10 x 50 or perhaps 8 x 40 seem better.
MF
AJ
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Post by AJ »

Leanne,

I have PMd you

AJ
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