Name twenty exoplanets and their stars

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brian livesey
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Name twenty exoplanets and their stars

Post by brian livesey »

This week the International Astronomical Union ( IAU ) ask the public to name 20 planetary systems, comprising 15 stars and 32 exoplanets.
Systems include 51 Pegasi b, the first exoplanet to be discovered in 1995 and that orbits a sun-like star.
Astronomical societies and non-profit organisations from 45 countries have submitted 247 suggestions for the names of the 20 ExoWorlds. These include Maria Mitchell the first American female astronomer, for the star 14 Andromedae; "Hikari", the Japanese word for light, for the star HD81688; and British climber Edward Whymper, for the planet 47 Ursae Majoris b.
A problem here is where does exoplanet and star-naming end in the long term, rather than just designating them catalogue numbers or letters? Planets are thought to be more numerous than stars, so it would be like attaching names to protozoans in a pond; the numbers are too vast.
Last edited by brian livesey on Sat Aug 15, 2015 9:09 am, edited 1 time in total.
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M54
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Re: Name twenty exoplanets and their stars

Post by M54 »

Read this previously, just cannot think why they are bothering.
Aren't the IAU supposed to perform serious astronomical activities?
brian livesey
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Re: Name twenty exoplanets and their stars

Post by brian livesey »

There might be a case for naming as-yet-undiscovered life-bearing planets, because of their special status.
The rest could be designated the usual catalogue numbers and letters, unless there was something extraordinary about them, that signalled them out for special attention.
brian
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