Trappist-1

The non amateur stuff. Hawking, black holes, that sort of thing

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brian livesey
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Trappist-1

Post by brian livesey »

The red dwarf star Trappist-1 has broken its silence ( the pun is unavoidable ) and revealed a coterie of seven planets: three of which Nasa describes as being Earth-like and possibly harbouring life.
Dr. Chris Copperwheat, a British astronomer at Liverpool John Moores University, who co-led the international team that made the discovery, said: The discovery of multiple rocky planets with surface temperatures that allow for liquid water make this amazing system an exciting future target in the search for life." A major player in the planet search is a robotic telescope operated by John Moores University, as reported in the journal "Nature". The telescope is one of a number of instruments that supported observations made by Nasa's orbiting Spitzer telescope.
All seven of the planets that orbit Trappist-1 approximate to Earth-size, and although their orbits are much closer in to the parent star than the orbit of Mercury around the Sun, the planets are warmed mildly by the red dwarf. Dr.Amaury Triaude , of the Institute of Astronomy at Cambridge, said: "We hope we will know if there's life there within the next decade."
Trappist-1 lies over 30 light years away in the constellation of Aquarius and has only 8 per cent of the mass of the Sun. Scientists at the University of Liege determined the size of the extrasolar planets. Dr. Emmanuel Jehin, a member of the Liege team, said: "We will soon be able to search for water and perhaps even evidence of life on these worlds."
Red Dwarves make good candidates in the search for Earth-like planets. Their weak output of light makes it easier to register the transit of planets across them, compared to finding them against the glaring background of bright stars. Seen from the location of these planets, the light from Trappist-1 would be 200 times less than the output of the Sun - comparable to a sunset.
Last edited by brian livesey on Thu Jul 27, 2017 4:10 pm, edited 2 times in total.
brian
stella
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Re: Trappist-1

Post by stella »

So that would be Doc, Grumpy, Happy, Sleepy, Bashful, Sneezy, and Dopey going
round a red dwarf?
Cliff
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Re: Trappist-1

Post by Cliff »

Dear Brian and Stella
I can only say that I personally am rather more interested in knowing if my life will be continuing for the next ten years and hopefully more.
Best wishes from Sneezy Cliff - Grumpy and Dopey as well !
RMSteele
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Re: Trappist-1

Post by RMSteele »

Sounds like you need an appointment to see Doc, Cliff. Best wishes Bob
Cliff
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Re: Trappist-1

Post by Cliff »

Dear Bob
That isn't funny, I already have one quite soon.
I wont comment too much about the recent Trappist-monk discovery in case I blow a gasket. But I don't hold grudges - well not much !!!!!
Anyone is welcome to attend one of my cosmological séances which I hold weekly on "Planet 9".
Best wishes from Cliff
RMSteele
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Re: Trappist-1

Post by RMSteele »

Cliff it's a good job you don't hold grudges with tactless oafs like me about. The séances sound cool; does the table rattle and your ducks fall off the wall, or is that just Manchester airport coming through? Bob :wink:
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