A holographic universe?

The non amateur stuff. Hawking, black holes, that sort of thing

Moderators: joe, Brian, Guy Fennimore

Post Reply
brian livesey
Posts: 5430
Joined: Mon Jan 09, 2006 11:05 am
Location: Lancashire
Contact:

A holographic universe?

Post by brian livesey »

The idea that we might exist in a universe with as many as 26 dimensions, and that our 3D impression is an illusion, was first mooted in the 1990s. The idea was prompted by theoretical astrophysicists investigating irregularities in the cosmic microwave background. They say that they have acquired substantial evidence to support the idea of a holographic universe.
Researchers at Southampton with associates in Italy and Canada, say that there's enough evidence to support their theory as there is for conventional explanations for the irregularities.
Kostas Skenderis, professsor of mathematical sciences at the University of Southhampton, said: "Imagine everything you see, feel and hear in three dimensions ( including your perception of time ) emanates from a flat two-dimensional field.
"The idea is similar to that of ordinary holograms where a three-dimensional image is encoded in a two-dimensional surface, such as the hologram on a credit card. However, this time, the entire universe is encoded." He said that the concept could be compared to viewing a 3D film Although this isn't a hologram, we see the picture as having width, height and depth, when, in fact, it originates from a flat 2D screen. The difference in our 3D universe is that we can touch objects and the "projection" is "real" from our perspective, he said.
The professor added:"Holography is a huge leap forward in the way that we think about the structure and creation of the universe. Einstein's theory of general relativity explains almost everything large scale in the universe very well, but starts to unravel when examining its origins and mechanisms at the quantum level.
"Scientists have been working for decades to combine Einstein's theory of gravity and quantum theory. Some believe the concept of a holographic universe has the potential to reconcile the two. I hope our research takes us another step towards this."
The research is published in the journal "Physical Review Letters" .
brian
Cliff
Posts: 6595
Joined: Sat Dec 11, 2004 8:18 pm
Location: Manchester
Contact:

Re: A holographic universe?

Post by Cliff »

Dear Brian
I suppose it is arguable that in an infinitely sized universe everything goes.
So perhaps part of the universe is holographic, and another part might even be hollow-graphic.
Best wishes from Cliff
RMSteele
Posts: 566
Joined: Thu Jun 02, 2016 11:32 am
Location: New Farnley, Leeds lat 53.8N long 1.6W
Contact:

Re: A holographic universe?

Post by RMSteele »

The more these suggestions of multi dimensionality are made in science, the more I am reminded of ancient eastern cosmology. The Diamond Sutra (maybe 2,500 years plus old) contains profound metaphors for greater and lesser (holographic?) realities. "Thus you shall think of this fleeting world...a bubble in a stream"...a phantom...a dream." Bob
Cliff
Posts: 6595
Joined: Sat Dec 11, 2004 8:18 pm
Location: Manchester
Contact:

Re: A holographic universe?

Post by Cliff »

Dear Bob et al(L)
To my pleasant surprise, there are a few articles in this weeks New Scientist (4th March) that might be of interest.
One in particular is by Stuart Clark - one of my favourite astronomical authors - entitled "Universal (un)truths" the cosmos as it is - but what if it isn't?.
What if 1) the speed of light were infinite, 2)Quantum Weirdness were weirder, 3) Time went both ways, 4) There were more than Three Dimensions, 5) Antimatter Worlds Exist.
Best wishes from Cliff
brian livesey
Posts: 5430
Joined: Mon Jan 09, 2006 11:05 am
Location: Lancashire
Contact:

Re: A holographic universe?

Post by brian livesey »

I haven't reached as far as Clark's NS article yet Cliff, to see if the scenarios he lists have theoretical bases or are mere hypotheses. At least, there seems to be empirical data to elevate holographic cosmology to the theoretical level.
brian
Cliff
Posts: 6595
Joined: Sat Dec 11, 2004 8:18 pm
Location: Manchester
Contact:

Re: A holographic universe?

Post by Cliff »

Dear BrianL
I hope the Stuart Clark article eventually proved of interest.
I'm afraid I can't get too enthusiastic about "modern" cosmology these days.
I think articles by Robert Matthews in BBC Focus January magazine "The death of a cherished theory could give scientists the closure they need to move on", which is about supersymetry, and another in BBC Science Focus mag March, Can we trust scientists in a post - truth world ?" (too many researchers seem to think that hard data alone is the hallmark of reliable science) might challenge your comment ?
Brings to mind that in the 19th century discrepancies in Uranus's orbit led to the discovery of Neptune. As a result of that some scientists attributed apparent discrepancies in Mercury's orbit to the pull of another unknown planet. searches for that planet were unsuccessful. Eventually Einstein's "New" Relativity provided an answer.
Just a thought (NOT to be taken too seriously !!!!!
Suppose this supposedly very fast spinning galaxy is actually in the process of breaking up but the process might not be obvious in our human kinds short life spans.
Perhaps the BIG BANG was actually a VERY SLOW BIIIIGGGG BAAANNNG!
Best but slowly wishes from Cliff
Post Reply