A pale blue exoplanet

The non amateur stuff. Hawking, black holes, that sort of thing

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brian livesey
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A pale blue exoplanet

Post by brian livesey »

There are some four thousand known exoplanets at the present time, and one of them is thought to have the best conditions discovered so far to support life. The planet is pale blue, twice the size of Earth and has about eight times its mass and gravity. It lies at a distance of 110 light years and orbits the red dwarf star K2-18 in 33 days within the star's habitable zone.
"This is absolutely the most promising planet for life outside Earth for some distance," said Professor Jonathan Tennyson, an astrophysicist at University College London. "It's a game changer - both in terms of confirming our hopes of finding a planet with water and in demonstrating that we have the technical ability to detect it."
The next step in studying K2-18b is to look for signs of methane, oxygen and carbon dioxide in the exoplanet's atmosphere, to possibly indicate the presence of life. Instruments and techniques are being developed that should be capable of detecting these "biological markers", although confirming life itself will be a very difficult task.
Over the coming years, many more potentially habitable exoplanets will be discovered. According to Professor Tennyson: "I think we will rapidly find hundreds of examples and almost certainly there will be life on one of them." - NATURE ASTRONOMY.
Last edited by brian livesey on Thu Sep 19, 2019 2:39 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Cliff
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Re: A pale blue exoplanet

Post by Cliff »

BrianL
Once an exo-planet's location in the sky is known, it should be easy to make contact with any inhabitants - just put a message in a bottle & chuck it in that direction as hard as possible into the sky. Oh! just a small point, DO NOT forget to make sure the cork is pushed quite hard into the bottle, but not so hard it drops inside the bottle. I once sent a message in a bottle but forgot to put a cork in, the bottle sunk & the message got soaked out of the paper.
Best of luck from Cliff

brian livesey
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Re: A pale blue exoplanet

Post by brian livesey »

If there's life on this water world Cliff, we can only wonder how it has adapted to a gravitational field that's 8 times greater than Earth's.
If there's land on the exoplanet, it would need a very sturdy set of legs to be able to get off the ground. And if there's marine life, achieving bouyancy might involve some novel adaptations.
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David Frydman
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Re: A pale blue exoplanet

Post by David Frydman »

The inhabitants will be ball shaped and roll around without legs :o

I threw numerous bottles into the sea from the end of Herne Bay pier every summer in the 1950s.
Early email.
The local fisherman got angry. They said I was disturbing the fish.
The letters were in old Corona lemonade bottles with rubber stoppers with a metal retainer one flipped down. I had to forego the refund on the empty bottles.

I got replies from many.

It took 40 days to reach Norway.
I got replies from Holland, Belgium etc.
And one from Margate 11 miles away.

Rather many pen palls, and I think I once met a girl who had received a letter in a bottle.
Possibly French, but I can't remember for sure.

These holidays were great.
We made our own entertainment.

Regards,
David

Cliff
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Re: A pale blue exoplanet

Post by Cliff »

David
Forgetting my tale of fiction about the cork-less bottle, I must admit I never tried sending any messages across the seas in any bottles. I think you were pretty successful with your bottle messages - nice ones !
from Cliff

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