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PostPosted: Sun Nov 23, 2008 10:38 pm 
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Sky News wrote:
Scientists in Canada are hunting for pieces of a meteor that spectacularly lit up the night sky and then exploded into pieces before falling to Earth.

Meteor captured on camera, lighting up the sky

Experts are calling it one of the biggest meteors seen in the country in the last decade.

Video here

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PostPosted: Sun Nov 23, 2008 11:36 pm 
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Dear Nealeh
Thanks !
I heard about the Canadian meteor earlier today, but have not seen any pics before seeing your post here.
I couldn't get the video you mention but the still image is certainly spectacular - makes the only meteor photo I ever got look very puny indeed, although I have visually seen several fireballs over the years.
My most spectacular was the so-called Bovedy meteor in 1969.
I was travelling through North Wales to Snowdonia in a car at the time.
Next day the newspaper said a fire engine had been sent out from (I think) Llanwrst up a mountain road to check out what had happened.
We saw it seem to break up and I vaguely remember hearing a sonic boom. Some bits crashed in Ireland I think one bit damaged an out-house roof and I think other bits (meteorites)were also found.
Best of luck from Cliff


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 24, 2008 7:32 am 
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nealeh wrote:

I'm afraid all I get is an NHS ad and prolonged buffering.

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PostPosted: Mon Nov 24, 2008 9:01 am 
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joe wrote:
nealeh wrote:

I'm afraid all I get is an NHS ad and prolonged buffering.

Yes that's the problem with Sky. I often find that using Internet Explorer (rather than Firefox) has better success on Sky.

But, as is the way of things, the footage is also on YouTube - here. I won't alter the earlier links so that the news reportage text can be read.

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PostPosted: Mon Nov 24, 2008 9:08 am 
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How odd - my post appeared twice - this one deleted.


Last edited by nealeh on Mon Nov 24, 2008 4:41 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Mon Nov 24, 2008 9:35 am 
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Thanks for the second link, Neale, it was worth it.

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PostPosted: Mon Nov 24, 2008 11:14 am 
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Sure it wasn't a toolkit? :D

Edit: Not meaning to detract from the original post, the video footage was really impressive...

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PostPosted: Fri Nov 28, 2008 5:25 pm 
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nealeh wrote:
Scientists in Canada are hunting for pieces of a meteor that spectacularly lit up the night sky and then exploded into pieces before falling to Earth.


There are now news reports that meteorite fragments have been found.

[Updated 2008 11 29 03:47]

Associated Press have additional details and photographs.

More here on CTV.ca.

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PostPosted: Sat Nov 29, 2008 11:47 am 
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The following first-hand report from the meteorite search area was posted to meteorobs by Bruce McCurdy.

Quote:
Hello from Marsden, Saskatchewan. I'm delighted to report that I was on hand today as the media horde descended on a farm just south of Lone Rock (!), SK, where several meteorite fragments were found frozen in a slough. It was quite the scene, with some 35 media people meeting at a fast food restaurant in Lloydminster, with some 20 vehicles joining a convoy for a 20-minute drive to the site. Plus a helicopter!

These meteorites, recovered by Ellen Milley and Alan Hildebrand of the University of Calgary, have been tentatively identified as ordinary chondrites of Type 5 or 6. Dr. Hildebrand estimates that some thousands of meteorites may have fallen in a strewn field some 3 by 8 km in extent.

Later as Frank and I roamed the area hoping to find a meteorite or two that may have fallen on crown land, we encountered another fellow with an astronomy interest who suggested we go to the Marsden Hotel pub about 20 km to the south. Here we saw an extraordinary site -- a 13 kilogram meteorite which had been recovered by an enterprising rock hound. It was a monster, somewhat larger than a human head. My fellow adventurer Frank Florian quickly confirmed it was indeed a meteorite, and somehow Alan Hildebrand caught wind of it and arrived a couple hours later for a look-see. He too immediately confirmed its extraterrestrial origin. Where it was found and who actually owns the thing remains an open question at this point.

Needless to say, though, it was a huge hit at the pub where the locals were passing it around and examining it carefully. Given it had already been handled rather excessively, there was no point in passing up the opportunity to pick up and hold this object which is simultaneously one of the newest and one of the oldest rocks on Earth. What a tremendous thrill to say the least.

The combined observation of seeing the fireball, observing some of its meteorites _in situ_, and now having touched a large member of the family ranks very high on my Life List.

More adventuring tomorrow; I'll write a more detailed report once we return to Edmonton.

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PostPosted: Sun Dec 07, 2008 2:33 pm 
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david entwistle wrote:
The following first-hand report from the meteorite search area was posted to meteorobs by Bruce McCurdy.


With reference to the Canadian meteorite fall resulting from the 20th November 2008 fireball, Canadian meteor and meteorite enthusiast Bruce McCurdy has now provided additional information and photographs regarding the search and the finds here. On behalf of the SPA Meteor Section, I'd like to express my thanks to Bruce for providing the wonderful images and commentary and to Stephen Bedingfield for his assistance in establishing Bruce's temporary website.

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PostPosted: Mon Dec 22, 2008 5:58 pm 
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Quote:
A University of Calgary-organized team recovered more than one hundred meteorites from the November 20 meteorite fall southwest of Lloydminster, Saskatchewan/Alberta, which is expected to set a new Canadian record for the largest recorded meteorite fall.


See the University of Calgary press release for additional details.

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PostPosted: Tue Dec 23, 2008 8:28 pm 
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Dear David
Thanks for providing the Nov 2008 Canadian Meteor(ites) gen.
Sheila, my wife, who is not an "astronomer" but enjoyed a Perseid watch a few years back also enjoyed seeing the Canadian pics.
Best wishes for Christmas and the New Year from Cliff


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PostPosted: Sun Feb 15, 2009 6:53 pm 
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Three papers discussing the "Buzzard Coulee" meteorites resulting from the 20th November 2008 Canadian fireball will be presented at the 40th Lunar and Planetary Science Conference (2009) March 23 - 27 in The Woodlands, Texas, USA.

1. CHARACTERISTICS OF A BRIGHT FIREBALL AND METEORITE FALL AT BUZZARD COULEE, SASKATCHEWAN, CANADA, NOVEMBER 20, 2008, by A.R. Hildebrand, E.P. Milley, P.G. Brown, P.J.A. McCausland, W. Edwards, M. Beech, A. Ling, G. Sarty, M.D. Paulson, L.A. Maillet, S.F. Jones and M.R. Stauffer.

Quote:
A bright fireball was widely ob-served across Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba during late twilight on November 20, 2008. Interviews of eyewitnesses and crude calibrations of security cameras constrained the fall region and the first search attempt recovered meteorites off the ice of a man made pond in Buzzard Coulee, SK, Nov. 27, 2008.


2. A FIRST LOOK AT THE PETROGRAPHY OF THE BUZZARD COULEE (H4) CHONDRITE, A RECENTLY OBSERVED FALL FROM SASKATCHEWAN, by M.L. Hutson, A.M. Ruzicka1, E.P. Milley, and A.R. Hildebrand.

Quote:
Buzzard Coulee is a recent (November 20, 2008) fall from Saskatchewan, Canada. Here we discuss the classification of this meteorite and point out some unusual features, including abundant cryptocrystalline chondrules and igneously-textured light-colored inclusions.


3. Mineralogy, petrology and cosmogenic radionuclide chemistry of the Buzzard Coulee H4 chondrite , by Walton E.L., Herd C. D. K. and Duke M.J.M.

Quote:
The Buzzard Coulee H4 chondrite was collected as fragments from a fireball witnessed at 5:23.46 MST on November 20, 2008 by thousands of residents across the Canadian prairies.

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PostPosted: Sun Apr 26, 2009 5:35 pm 
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david entwistle wrote:
There are now news reports that meteorite fragments have been found.


After the winter's snow has cleared, the search for meteorites resumes at Buzzard Coulee. See this link for updates.

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