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PostPosted: Sat Sep 11, 2010 9:16 am 
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Good news from the University of Hertfordshire - they're setting up a network of all-sky cameras.

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The Bayfordbury camera has already detected twenty-six potential fireballs, and a few actual fireballs from the recent Perseid meteor shower. Another camera has been set up at Hemel Hempstead and one at the Isle of Wight and a camera is currently being set up in Norfolk, which means that very soon the astronomers will be in a position to triangulate the path of an incoming meteor and help in the recovery of meteorites.

The Bayfordbury all-sky camera web site is here.

The recent meteor events are here.

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PostPosted: Sat Sep 11, 2010 11:48 am 
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Indeed, this is good news David.

Better still, I've learnt within the last few days that the first successfully triangulated trajectory has been secured, from a lovely fireball caught by three of the University's stations at 00:39 UT on September 4-5. That object looks to have been over Hertfordshire (appropriately) to Essex, descending from ~105 km to ~80 km during its flight. No velocity data thanks to a computer fault, but this is an excellent early result, and many congratulations go to all involved. Especial thanks to regular Forum contributor 12dstring for keeping me informed about this meteor.

Here's to many more!

Alastair McBeath,
Meteor Director, Society for Popular Astronomy.
Meteor homepage: http://www.popastro.com/sections/meteor.htm
E-mail: <meteor@popastro.com> (messages under 150 kB in size only, please)


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 Post subject: Satellite
PostPosted: Sat Sep 11, 2010 11:53 am 
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In the "Interesting images" section, there is an 'unidentified satellite'.
I have identified it as IGS 1B, a classified Japanese radar satellite, now
tumbling in orbit. Also known as 2003-09B.


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PostPosted: Sat Sep 11, 2010 4:37 pm 
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Alastair McBeath wrote:
Better still, I've learnt within the last few days that the first successfully triangulated trajectory has been secured, from a lovely fireball caught by three of the University's stations at 00:39 UT on September 4-5. That object looks to have been over Hertfordshire (appropriately) to Essex, descending from ~105 km to ~80 km during its flight. No velocity data thanks to a computer fault, but this is an excellent early result, and many congratulations go to all involved. Especial thanks to regular Forum contributor 12dstring for keeping me informed about this meteor.


That is excellent news.

If anyone is interested in attempting to determine the path of a meteor from multiple observations, the basic method is covered here in the absolute beginner's forum.

There's a more detailed description of a couple of methods in this paper, "The comparison of two methods of determining meteor trajectories from photographs" by Borovicka.

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PostPosted: Sat Sep 11, 2010 5:22 pm 
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Alastair McBeath wrote:
Better still, I've learnt within the last few days that the first successfully triangulated trajectory has been secured, from a lovely fireball caught by three of the University's stations at 00:39 UT on September 4-5. That object looks to have been over Hertfordshire (appropriately) to Essex, descending from ~105 km to ~80 km during its flight. No velocity data thanks to a computer fault, but this is an excellent early result, and many congratulations go to all involved. Especial thanks to regular Forum contributor 12dstring for keeping me informed about this meteor.


There's more good news... :D

Klaas Jobse, operator of all-sky station EN97, in Oostkapelle, has been in touch to say he believes he may have a simultaneous observation from 2010-09-06 00:39:57 UT and he's optimistic of more simultaneous observations, across the North Sea, in the future.

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PostPosted: Sat Sep 11, 2010 6:27 pm 
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Apologies to one and all, as it seems I gave some incorrect information regarding this fireball earlier today. I've checked the time-stamps on the images since, and the Herts University event was definitely on September 5-6, not 4-5 as I wrote.

Additionally, the path direction was moving inland, so from Essex to Herts, not the other way round, and descending from 103 to 81 km altitude.

That'll teach me to try to assimilate and construct meteor notes "live" online!

Meanwhile, the news about this event just gets better and better, as it seems as well as Klaas Jobse's success, a Cambridge University all-sky camera also recorded the fireball, along with another UK video-meteor observer, and it may have been seen by a lucky visual observer on the Hampshire coast!

Alastair McBeath,
Meteor Director, Society for Popular Astronomy.
Meteor homepage: http://www.popastro.com/sections/meteor.htm
E-mail: <meteor@popastro.com> (messages under 150 kB in size only, please)


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PostPosted: Mon Sep 13, 2010 9:26 am 
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Thanks for the mention David, we're looking forward to contributing many more fireball reports in the future 8)

Thanks too Stella for the satellite identification. I'd ruled it out as an Iridium flare but must have somehow missed it when looking down the satellite list on Heavens-above. It's now updated.

Klaas's capture seems to be undoubtedly the same fireball. As well as the same time the direction and heading correspond, and you can make out the same brightness profile with a sudden peak and a smaller one following it.

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http://www.12dstring.me.uk/astro.htm


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 15, 2010 9:59 am 
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On September 14 image at 20:06:07 U.T., the streak near cassiopeia
is the classified satellite USA 129, #24680, 1996-72A.


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PostPosted: Thu Sep 16, 2010 1:56 pm 
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Location: 55° 57'N: 03° 08'W
On September 16 image at 03:20:10 U.T., the streak through Cassiopeia
is the classified satellite Lacrosse 5, #28646, 05-16A.


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