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 Post subject: Meteor Spotted over US.
PostPosted: Thu Feb 21, 2008 8:03 pm 
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Location: Ipswich, Suffolk.
Interesting link. :wink:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/player/nol/newsid_7250000/newsid_7255600/7255695.stm?bw=bb&mp=wm&asb=1&news=1&bbcws=1

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PostPosted: Sat Mar 01, 2008 10:20 am 
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Joined: Sun Aug 13, 2006 12:29 pm
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Location: Goosnargh, north of Preston, UK
Well spotted Hawk.

In addition to the various news reports and security camera footage, meteor observer Jeff Brower (British Columbia) captured an image on his Sentinel III all-sky camera. Jeff provided the following information relating to this 2008 02 19 13:30:59 UT fireball event visible from the northwest USA and British Columbia...

Quote:
As you will see it's not that spectacular of a video because most of it, the terminal burst, occurred below my horizon, it had a high angle of incidence and occurred between astronomical an civil twilight that morning. To make it more challenging I have high mountains directly across the lake from me so my horizon is 10-12 degrees higher due to the peaks blocking my true horizon.

As usual, the security cameras footage had some inaccurate headings and time stamps that muddied the path analysis. Western US and Canada has a great seismic network and we were able to use the amplitude foot prints of those to refine the flight path. I've put out a query to the Washington State University infra-sound network data so we can determine the energy levels of the event. So far I have no word from them.

As it stands we know the terminal point was southeast of Walla Walla, Washington, in NE Oregon.

The terminal burst boom was widely reported in northern Oregon towns of Pendleton and Hermiston according to Alex Ruzicka at Portland State University

In a personal communication (February 21, 2008 18:06:08 PST) Dr. Alan R. Hildebrand (Canada Research Chair in Planetary Science and Coordinator of the Canadian Fireball Reporting Centre and MIAC) wrote:

"... Orbits calculated from a preliminary trajectory indicate a low entry velocity of ~13 km/sec (similar to St-Robert), v. favourable for meteorite survival. Unfortunately, the endpoint is now over the Umatilla Wilderness area of the Umatilla National Forest ...

This new more southerly position would put fireball at ~650 km from Calgary - recall that eye witnesses here described it as bright and that Jeff Brower's and Don Hladiuk's (Calgary, Alberta - jb) cameras recorded the flash of terminal burst in sky although the fireball had gone "over the horizon" for both of them. Based on knowing little I would guess that this was comparable to St-Robert meteoroid in size or approximately one tonne in mass... "


Jeff has derived the fireball intensity amplitude curve [50KB]...

http://www.avrt93.dsl.pipex.com/Pictures/_Fireball20080219/Cur2mS_2.jpg

Jeff's Quicktime movie of the event recorded on his Sentinel III all-sky camera [516KB] (Broadband required).

http://www.avrt93.dsl.pipex.com/Pictures/_Fireball20080219/v20080219_133059.34%20copy.mov

Related news reports and videos of the same event (broadband required)...
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q8dqkJwgoEw
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rDPxGcYMi-4&feature=related
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tUBrxviguj0&feature=related
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kjeHjwugTBs&feature=related
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=InX3AKBnOhw&feature=related

Links to information about the 1994 06 14 St Robert event referred to above...

http://gsc.nrcan.gc.ca/meteor/strobert_e.php
http://www.meteorlab.com/METEORLAB2001dev/robrtxt.htm

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PostPosted: Sun Mar 09, 2008 8:06 am 
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Location: Pendleton
Hello,
I was hoping to get some better lat and long coordinates. Perhaps someone saw something posted somewhere or has access to the data and would be willing to share?

I live in Pendleton, Oregon and my family and I were awakened by the 'sonic boom' created by this meteor(ite). It sounded (more like felt) like a couple of dump trucks rumbling down our quiet little street. If my work schedule hadn't just changed from 6am to 8am I would have been outside scraping my windshield when the meteor went over. dang dang dang! man the luck!

I have been out a couple of times looking for any signs of debris but no luck yet. There is still quite a bit of snow in the areas I am looking right now and it's snowed several times since the event.

Any help would be appreciated.

Cheers,
Rob


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PostPosted: Sun Mar 09, 2008 8:56 am 
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Joined: Sun Aug 13, 2006 12:29 pm
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Location: Goosnargh, north of Preston, UK
The following information relates to the 2008 02 19 13:30:59 UT fireball seen over north-west USA and British Columbia. For UK readers, I should make it clear that we are talking about Pendleton, Oregan, USA and not Pendleton, Lancashire (sadly)...

Hi Rob,

That must have been quite an experience.

I think the short answer to your question is that no one knows for sure where resulting meteorites would have fallen, but you are certainly in the right general area. Any new and acurate eye-witness reports, particularly from so close to the likely fall area, would clearly be most valuable. If you know of any witnesses of the event who have not yet filed a report, then please ask them to do so. They can contact me, at the address below, and I'll point them in the right direction.

In addition to the information provided above, the most reliable information I've seen is from the Cascadia Meteorite Laboratory, Portland State University.

http://meteorites.pdx.edu/PNWmeteor022008.htm

Here's what they say...

[quote]
Scientists including Dick Pugh and Alex Ruzicka at the Cascadia Meteorite Laboratory (CML) at Portland State University are sorting through dozens of phone calls and emails sent in to the laboratory to determine whether the bright meteor (fireball) seen over a large region of the Pacific Northwest yesterday (February 19) at around 5:30 AM Pacific Time produced any meteorites and if so, where they might be found. Based on eyewitness and seismic data, it appears that the meteor probably did produce meteorites (rocks on the ground) northeast of Pendleton in Oregon. Eyewitnesses from Oregon,Washington, British Columbia, Idaho, Montana, and California saw a fireball moving generally northwest to southeast. This trajectory is generally consistent with video of the fireball taken from Portland, Oregon and elsewhere. Sonic booms sufficiently loud to rattle windows and startle people awake were reported in Hermiston and Pendleton in Oregon; at these locations the fireball was bright enough to turn night into day for a few seconds. Less intense sonic booms were reported in Union, Oregon. At least one and possibly two major break-ups of the meteor occurred shortly before it hit the ground, producing dozens of tracks with three major ones apparently corresponding to large pieces of material. Some eyewitnesses said the natural display reminded them of a “Roman Candleâ€

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Last edited by david entwistle on Sun Mar 09, 2008 1:19 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Mar 09, 2008 12:39 pm 
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Joined: Sun Mar 09, 2008 12:35 pm
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I saw this!

I was in the car and I saw a blue, gold ball shoot across the sky and dissapear. I ran out of the car (we had parked when this had happened) into the garden but saw nothing else.

The thing is, I'm in Northampton, England. Anybody else see it over here?


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PostPosted: Sun Mar 09, 2008 1:03 pm 
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Location: Goosnargh, north of Preston, UK
Hi Glitterskin,

Meteors are upper atmosphere events and as such are seen over a relatively small geographical area - within several hundred kilometeres of the meteor itself. Consequently, you wouldn't have seen the same event reported from the north-west US. However, there have been a number of bright fireballs reported from various parts of the UK and Europe and the fireball you saw may correspond with one of those.

Fireball reports, especially from the British Isles and nearby areas, are always welcomed. See the Fireball Observing page on this website for details of what to record on seeing a fireball, and where to report your data to.

http://www.popastro.com/sections/meteor/fireball.htm

You can see a list of recent reports on the fireball report page

http://www.popastro.com/sections/meteor/fireball_sightings.htm

with additional reports included in ENB 239.

http://www.popastro.com/phpBB2/viewtopic.php?t=8925

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